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Where Do the Supreme Court’s Civil Cases Originate (Part 2)?

Yesterday, we began our year-by-year review of where the Court’s civil cases have originated since 1994.  By doing so, we can see trends in the administrative and executive agencies where the Court’s cases come from.  Last time, we reviewed the data for 1994, 1995 and 1996.  Today, we’re looking at the years 1997-1999. For 1997, … Continue Reading

Where Do the Supreme Court’s Civil Cases Originate (Part 1)?

In our recent expansion of Sedgwick’s California Supreme Court database, one of the variables we added was the originating jurisdiction.  Given that the Court always has a significant number of administrative mandate cases, originating jurisdiction is a more precise measure of where the Court’s cases are coming from than solely tracking the original trial court. … Continue Reading

Are Defendants Winning Criminal Appeals More Often (Part 2 – 2006-2016)?

Yesterday, we looked at whether defendants are winning a higher fraction of appeals in criminal cases between 1994 and 2005.  Today, we’re looking at the years 2006 through 2016. In 2010, defendants won eleven criminal cases.  In 2012, defendants won ten cases.  Beginning in 2014, defendants have won more cases each year – twelve in … Continue Reading

Are Defendants Winning Criminal Appeals More Often (Part 1 – 1994-2005)?

Earlier this week, I joined “Air Talk” on KPCC radio for a discussion of the California Supreme Court’s recent criminal decisions, beginning with People v. Gutierrez, in which the Court reversed three convictions for the first time in many years based upon Batson/Wheeler (strikes from the jury pool based on minority status) error.  So I … Continue Reading

Do Winning Parties Tend to Have More Amicus Support in Criminal Cases (Part 2)?

Yesterday, we analyzed the Court’s experience with amicus briefs in criminal cases between 1994 and 2005.  Today, we’ll look at the Court’s experience with amicus briefs in criminal cases between 2006 and 2016. Winners averaged more amicus support than losing parties in criminal affirmances only about one-third of the time during this period.  In 2006, … Continue Reading

Do Winning Parties Tend to Have More Amicus Support in Criminal Cases (Part 1)?

Last week, we examined whether winning parties tended to average more amicus support in civil cases between 1994 and 2016.  This week, we look at the Court’s experience with amicus briefs in criminal cases. In Table 215, we report the data for affirmances between 1994 and 2006.  We see very little correlation between the number … Continue Reading

Do Winning Parties Tend to Have More Amicus Support in Civil Cases (Part 2)?

Yesterday, we reviewed who averaged the most amicus support in civil cases between 1994 and 2005 – winning parties, losers, or parties who won only in part.  Today, we address the data for the years 2006 through 2016. Petitioners nearly always averaged more amicus briefs when the Court reversed (i.e., winning petitioners) than when the … Continue Reading

Do Winning Parties Tend to Have More Amicus Support in Civil Cases (Part 1)?

For the past two weeks, we’ve been reviewing the data on the Supreme Court’s experience with amicus briefs, asking whether petitioners or respondents tend to average more amicus support.  Now, as a further step towards modeling the impact of amicus briefs, let’s look at whether winning or losing petitioners or respondents average more amicus support. … Continue Reading

Which Side Tends to File the Most Amicus Briefs in Criminal Cases (Part 1)?

Last week, we reviewed the year-by-year data since 1994 for amicus briefs, looking at whether more amici tend to support the petitioner or the respondent.  This week, we’re looking at the Court’s experience with amicus briefs in criminal cases. The primary lesson of the data is the obvious one: amicus briefs are far less commonplace … Continue Reading

Which Side Tends to File the Most Amicus Briefs in Civil Cases (Part 2)?

Yesterday, we looked at the year-by-year data in civil cases, dividing total amicus briefs up by the side supported – petitioner, respondent, and neither side/can’t determine.  We discovered that three quarters of the time between 1994 and 2005, the petitioner averaged more amicus briefs than the respondent.  So what about the second half of the … Continue Reading

Where is Justice Werdegar on the Ideological Spectrum for Criminal Law Cases?

Last week, we continued our analysis of Justice Werdegar’s career by reviewing her majority opinions in criminal cases. We report Justice Werdegar’s dissents in criminal cases, year by year, in Table 204.  Justice Werdegar wrote two dissents in 1995, five in 1997, three in 1998, two in 1999 and three in 2000.  Justice Werdegar wrote … Continue Reading

Which Area of Criminal Law Has Justice Werdegar Written the Most Majority Opinions In?

Last week, we analyzed Justice Werdegar’s majority opinions in civil cases.  This week, we’ll look at Justice Werdegar’s opinions in criminal cases. We report Justice Werdegar’s majority opinions, year by year, in criminal cases in Table 202.  Justice Werdegar’s high points have come in 1996, 2007 and 2008, with ten majority opinions each year.  She … Continue Reading

Where is Justice Werdegar on the Ideological Spectrum, Area of Law by Area of Law

Our statistical retrospective of Justice Kathryn M. Werdegar’s tenure on the California Supreme Court continues today with an analysis of Justice Werdegar’s dissents and an analysis of the ideological distribution of Justice Werdegar’s majority opinions. In Table 200 below, we report Justice Werdegar’s dissents divided by area of law.  Justice Werdegar has written two dissents … Continue Reading

Which Area of Law Has Justice Werdegar Written the Most Civil Majority Opinions In?

Last week, we began our statistical retrospective of Justice Kathryn M. Werdegar’s twenty-three years on the California Supreme Court.  Today, we further consider Justice Werdegar’s majority opinions and dissents in civil cases. In Table 198, we once again report Justice Werdegar’s year-by-year majority opinions in civil cases.  She wrote five majority opinions in 1995, four … Continue Reading

Justice Werdegar By the Numbers, Part 2: Voting to Reverse and Joining the Court Majority

Yesterday, we began our retrospective of the tenure of Justice Kathryn M. Werdegar, who will retire on August 31, 2017.  We tracked the total number of cases, both civil and criminal, in which Justice Werdegar has participated, as well as looking at how frequently she filed opinions – majorities, concurrences and dissents – from year … Continue Reading

Justice Werdegar By the Numbers (Part 1 in a Series)

Early last month, Justice Kathryn M. Werdegar announced that she will retire from the California Supreme Court, effective August 31, 2017. Justice Werdegar’s retirement caps a distinguished twenty-three year career on the Supreme Court. Prior to her elevation to the Supreme Court, Justice Werdegar served as as Associate Justice on the California Court of Appeal, … Continue Reading

2,297 Cases and More Than 200,000 Data Points – Exploring the New CSCR Data Library

Yesterday, we announced that we’ve expanded the data library which powers the California Supreme Court Review – by a lot.  We’ve added many new data points for all the cases which were already in the database, as well as moving the start point of the library back to November 1, 1994 – just before Associate … Continue Reading

Do Affirmances Take Longer in Non-Death Penalty Criminal Appeals (2008-2016)?

Yesterday, we looked at how much correlation there was between result and lag times in death penalty appeals between 2008 and 2016. Today, we’re looking at the non-death penalty criminal docket for the same period. We started this analysis because of the surprising results looking at civil versus criminal cases – affirmances took about 20 … Continue Reading

Do Affirmances Take Longer in Automatic Death Penalty Appeals (2008-2016)?

For the past several weeks, we’ve been comparing the Court’s lag times – time to oral argument, and then oral argument to decision – for affirmances as opposed to reversals. We’ve determined that affirmances tend to take longer from outset to argument than reversals do. The difference between affirmances and reversals is much greater for … Continue Reading

Do Affirmances Take Longer in Automatic Death Penalty Appeals (2000-2007)?

We’ve been reviewing the data for lag time from grant of review to oral argument to decision in criminal cases, dividing the data up to separate non-death and death penalty appeals, searching for an explanation of why lag time for affirmances has been considerably longer than lag time for reversals between 2000 and 2007.  Today, … Continue Reading
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