Archives: Amicus Briefs

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Do Winning Parties Tend to Have More Amicus Support in Criminal Cases (Part 2)?

Yesterday, we analyzed the Court’s experience with amicus briefs in criminal cases between 1994 and 2005.  Today, we’ll look at the Court’s experience with amicus briefs in criminal cases between 2006 and 2016. Winners averaged more amicus support than losing parties in criminal affirmances only about one-third of the time during this period.  In 2006, … Continue Reading

Do Winning Parties Tend to Have More Amicus Support in Criminal Cases (Part 1)?

Last week, we examined whether winning parties tended to average more amicus support in civil cases between 1994 and 2016.  This week, we look at the Court’s experience with amicus briefs in criminal cases. In Table 215, we report the data for affirmances between 1994 and 2006.  We see very little correlation between the number … Continue Reading

Do Winning Parties Tend to Have More Amicus Support in Civil Cases (Part 2)?

Yesterday, we reviewed who averaged the most amicus support in civil cases between 1994 and 2005 – winning parties, losers, or parties who won only in part.  Today, we address the data for the years 2006 through 2016. Petitioners nearly always averaged more amicus briefs when the Court reversed (i.e., winning petitioners) than when the … Continue Reading

Do Winning Parties Tend to Have More Amicus Support in Civil Cases (Part 1)?

For the past two weeks, we’ve been reviewing the data on the Supreme Court’s experience with amicus briefs, asking whether petitioners or respondents tend to average more amicus support.  Now, as a further step towards modeling the impact of amicus briefs, let’s look at whether winning or losing petitioners or respondents average more amicus support. … Continue Reading

Which Side Tends to File the Most Amicus Briefs in Criminal Cases (Part 1)?

Last week, we reviewed the year-by-year data since 1994 for amicus briefs, looking at whether more amici tend to support the petitioner or the respondent.  This week, we’re looking at the Court’s experience with amicus briefs in criminal cases. The primary lesson of the data is the obvious one: amicus briefs are far less commonplace … Continue Reading

Which Side Tends to File the Most Amicus Briefs in Civil Cases (Part 2)?

Yesterday, we looked at the year-by-year data in civil cases, dividing total amicus briefs up by the side supported – petitioner, respondent, and neither side/can’t determine.  We discovered that three quarters of the time between 1994 and 2005, the petitioner averaged more amicus briefs than the respondent.  So what about the second half of the … Continue Reading

Tracking the California Supreme Court’s Experience With Amicus Briefs in Criminal Cases (2008-2015)

Yesterday, we reviewed the California Supreme Court’s experience with amicus curiae briefs in civil cases between 2008 and 2015.  Today, we conclude this topic with a review of the Court’s criminal cases during the same years. Just as was true for the years 2000 to 2007, amicus briefs have been nowhere near as commonplace in … Continue Reading

Tracking the California Supreme Court’s Experience With Amicus Briefs in Civil Cases (2008-2015)

Last week, we began our analysis of a new issue, tracking the California Supreme Court’s considerable experience with amicus curiae briefs in both civil and criminal cases.  Last week, we covered the years 2000 through 2007.  Today, we turn our attention to civil cases from 2008 to 2015. In Table 122, we report the total … Continue Reading

Tracking the California Supreme Court’s Experience With Amicus Briefs in Criminal Cases (2000-2007)

Yesterday, we began a detailed look at the California Supreme Court’s extensive experience with amicus curiae briefs, beginning with civil cases between 2000 and 2007.  Today, we turn our attention to the Court’s less extensive experience with amicus briefs in criminal cases. In Table 120 below, we report the total number of amicus briefs accepted … Continue Reading

Tracking the California Supreme Court’s Experience With Amicus Briefs in Civil Cases (2000-2007)

Today, we begin our analysis of a new subject – tracking the California Supreme Court’s experience with amicus curiae briefs.  The Court more closely tracks the experience of the United States Supreme Court than of other state Supreme Courts (including the Illinois Supreme Court, as reported in our Illinois Supreme Court Review) in its open-handed … Continue Reading
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