Archives: Data Analytics

Subscribe to Data Analytics RSS Feed

How Did Justices Kruger and Groban Vote in Cases Involving Insurer Parties?

Since she joined the Court in 2015, Justice Kruger has participated in six cases involving insurer parties, splitting her votes down the middle – three for the insurer party, three against. Justice Kruger has participated in three cases won by the insurers at the Court of Appeal, voting to affirm one insurer win and voting … Continue Reading

How Did Justice Cuellar Vote in Civil Cases With Insurer Parties?

So far we’ve reviewed four Justices’ voting records in civil cases with insurers as named parties. Today, we’re looking at the data for Justice Cuellar. Like Justice Liu, Justice Cuellar has split his votes right down the middle on the six insurer cases he’s participated in – three votes for the insurer’s position, three votes … Continue Reading

How Did Justice Liu Vote in Civil Cases With Insurer Parties?

Today we continue our seven-part post reviewing the voting records of the individual Justices in civil cases involving insurers as named parties. Since joining the Court in 2011, Justice Liu has participated in eight such cases. He has evenly split his votes – four votes against the insurer’s position, four votes for. Four of these … Continue Reading

How Did Chief Justice Cantil-Sakauye Vote in Civil Cases With Insurer Parties?

This is part three of our seven-part post reviewing the Justices’ voting records in cases involving insurer parties. Today: the Chief Justice. The Court has decided significantly fewer insurer cases from 2011 to 2019 than it did in the previous ten years. Since joining the Court, Chief Justice Cantil-Sakauye has voted for insurer parties in … Continue Reading

How Did Justice Corrigan Vote in Civil Cases With Insurer Parties?

Last week, we began a seven-part series reviewing each Justice’s voting record, one area of law at a time – beginning with civil cases involving an insurer party. Since 2006, Justice Corrigan has voted for insurer parties 11 times while voting against insurer parties ten times. From 2006 to 2010, she voted for insurers seven … Continue Reading

How Has Justice Chin Voted in Insurance Law Cases?

Today, we begin a seven-post series, reviewing the voting records of all seven current Justices in insurance law cases. First up is the Court’s senior Justice (by longevity), Justice Ming Chin, who announced his retirement last week. Since joining the Court in 1997, Justice Chin has supported insurers’ positions in 31 cases involving insurance law, … Continue Reading

How Did Insurers Fare at the Supreme Court Between 2000 and 2009?

We saw yesterday that between 1990 and 1999, insurers did quite well in insurance law cases at the Supreme Court, winning twenty while losing only twelve. Things took a sharp turn with the new decade, however; between 2000 and 2009, insurers won only seventeen cases while losing nineteen. Between 2000 and 2002, insurers won only … Continue Reading

How Did Insurers Fare at the Supreme Court Between 1990 and 1999?

Today, we’re beginning a series of posts examining the Supreme Court’s record with insurance law cases since 1990. First, let’s look at the simplest data point: the won-loss record for insurer parties. Between 1990 and 1999, insurers did quite well at the Court, winning twenty cases while losing only twelve. Insurers won four of six … Continue Reading

What’s the Average Lag Time from Grant of the Petition for Review in Non-Death Penalty Criminal Cases to Oral Argument?

Today, we’re looking at the overall lag time data: the average period from the order granting the petition for review in non-death penalty criminal cases to oral argument. The average was 392.57 days in 1990, 310.56 in 1991, 440.04 in 1992, 451.64 in 1993, 442.29 in 1994, 485.35 in 1995, 575.1 in 1996, 320.8 in … Continue Reading

What’s the Average Lag Time from Filing of the Final Brief in Non-Death Penalty Criminal Cases to Oral Argument?

Today, we’re reviewing the average lag time for our proxy for the Supreme Court’s decisional period in non-death penalty criminal cases: the lag time from the filing of the final brief – whether the reply brief, an amicus brief or a supplemental brief – to oral argument. The average lag time was 262.47 days in … Continue Reading

How Long Does Amicus and Supplemental Briefing Typically Take in Non-Death Penalty Criminal Cases?

In this post, we’re addressing the typical lag times involved between the end of party briefing in non-death penalty criminal cases and the filing of the final amicus or supplemental brief. Because amicus and supplemental briefs are considerably less commonplace in criminal cases than they are in civil cases, the numbers show a lot of … Continue Reading

What’s the Average Lag Time from the Order Appointing Appellate Counsel to the Filing of the Opening Brief in Non-Death Criminal Cases?

The average lag time from the order appointing appellate counsel in non-death criminal cases to the filing of the opening brief was 30 days in 1990, 35.14 in 1991, 44.5 in 1992, 50.38 in 1993 and 38.38 days in 1994. The average jumped to 114.35 days in 1995 before falling back to 39.71 days in … Continue Reading

What’s the Average Wait from Granting of the Petition to Review to the Order Appointing Counsel in Non-Death Criminal Cases?

For the past few weeks, we’ve been reviewing detailed lag time data for criminal (and civil cases). Now, we’re dividing death penalty and non-death criminal cases. First up, the average lag time from the date the non-death petition to review is granted to issuance of the order appointing appellate counsel. In 1990, the average lag … Continue Reading

What’s the Average Wait from Oral Argument in Death Penalty Cases to the Court’s Decision?

Today, we’re concluding our trip through the death penalty lag time data with a look at the final step in capital litigation: the average wait from oral argument to decision. In 1990, the average wait was 186.42 days (the result of an outlier case). In 1991, the average was 60.16 days. The average was then … Continue Reading

Is There any Relationship in Death Penalty Cases Between the Lag Time from End of Briefing to Oral Argument and the Case Result?

Last week, we reviewed the data for the average wait between the end of briefing in death penalty cases and the oral argument. Today, we’re looking at a related question – does the lag time between briefing and oral argument suggest anything about the ultimate result in the case? We divide the data into four … Continue Reading

What’s the Average Wait from the Filing of the Last Brief in Death Penalty Cases to Oral Argument?

Today, we’re continuing our review of the death penalty lag time data, looking at the average wait from the filing of the final brief – whether that’s the party reply brief or an amicus or supplemental brief – to the oral argument. In 1990, the average was 225.23 days. It was 265.92 in 1991, 217.3 … Continue Reading

What’s the Average Wait from Filing the Reply Brief in Death Penalty Cases to the Filing of any Supplemental or Amicus Briefs?

Our next milestone in reviewing the lag time data for death penalty cases is the period from the end of party briefing – the filing of the reply brief – to the filing of the last supplemental or amicus brief (including replies to one or the other). Amicus briefs have been very rare in death … Continue Reading

What’s the Average Wait from Filing the Opening Brief to the Reply Brief in Death Penalty Cases?

Today, we’re reviewing the data for the average length of time party briefing in death penalty cases take – the lag time from filing of the opening brief to filing of the reply. The average wait was 237.65 days in 1990, 334.92 in 1991, 399.5 in 1992, 354.12 in 1993, 323.43 in 1994 and 344.4 … Continue Reading

What’s the Average Wait from Appointment of Death Penalty Counsel to Filing the Opening Brief?

This week, we’re continuing our review of the detailed lag time data for the Court’s death penalty cases. First up: the average wait from the order appointing death penalty counsel to filing of the opening brief. During the 1990s, the average wait from appointment of counsel to the filing of the opening brief increased significantly. … Continue Reading
LexBlog