Archives: Data Analytics

Subscribe to Data Analytics RSS Feed

Where Did the Fourth District’s Criminal Cases Come From, 1990-2004?

Last week, we tracked the data for which county trial courts accounted for the Supreme Court’s civil cases from the Fourth District from 1990 to 2019.  This week, we’re looking at the criminal side of the ledger. In 1990, the Supreme Court decided three criminal cases from San Diego county and one from Riverside.  In … Continue Reading

Where Did the Fourth District’s Civil Cases Come From, 2005-2019?

In 2005, the Court decided four cases from San Diego, three from Riverside, two from San Bernardino and one from Orange county.  In 2006 and 2007, the Fourth District’s smallest counties, Imperial and Inyo, finally broke through with their first civil cases since our data begins in 1990.  In 2006, the Court decided four cases … Continue Reading

Where Did the Fourth District’s Civil Cases Come From, 1990-2004?

For the past several weeks, we’ve been looking at the data on which trial courts produced the Supreme Court’s civil and criminal cases for each District of the Court of Appeal, year by year since 1990.  This week, we’re looking at the data for civil cases from the Fourth District. The Fourth District is comprised … Continue Reading

Where Did the Third District’s Criminal Cases Come From, 2005-2019?

Last time, we reviewed the data on which county trial courts originated the Third District criminal cases decided by the Supreme Court between 1990 and 2004.  Now let’s finish up with the years 2005 to 2019. In 2005, the Court decided two criminal cases from Sacramento and one from San Joaquin.  In 2006, the Court … Continue Reading

Where Did the Third District’s Criminal Cases Come From, 1990-2004?

Last week, we reviewed the data on which trial court produced the Supreme Court’s Third District civil cases from 1990 to 2019.  This week, we’re reviewing the Court’s criminal cases from the Third District.  There are twenty-three counties in California’s Third District: Alpine, Amador, Butte, Calaveras, Colusa, El Dorado, Glenn, Lassen, Modoc, Mono, Nevada, Placer, … Continue Reading

Where Did the Third District’s Civil Cases Come From, 2005-2019?

In 2005, the Court decided five civil cases which originated in Sacramento and two from El Dorado.  In 2006, the Court decided five Sacramento cases and one each from Shasta and Sierra.  The following year, five cases originated in Sacramento and one each came from San Joaquin, Shasta and Sutter.  In 2008, four cases came … Continue Reading

Where Did the Third District’s Civil Cases Come From, 1990-2004?

Over the past two weeks, we’ve reviewed the Supreme Court’s Second District civil and criminal cases since 1990.  This week and next, we’re looking at the Court’s Third District cases. The Third District covers twenty-three California counties: Alpine, Amador, Butte, Calaveras, Colusa, El Dorado, Glenn, Lassen, Modoc, Mono, Nevada, Placer, Plumas, Sacramento, San Joaquin, Shasta, … Continue Reading

Where Did the Court’s Second District’s Criminal Cases Come From (2005-2019)?

In 2005, the Court decided eight criminal cases from Los Angeles county.  In 2006, the Court decided five cases from Los Angeles and one from Santa Barbara.  The following year, the Court decided a dozen cases from Los Angeles and one from San Luis Obispo.  In 2008, the Court decided another dozen cases from Los … Continue Reading

Where Did the Court’s Second District Criminal Cases Come From (1990-2004)?

Last week, we examined the data for the county-by-county spread of the Supreme Court’s Second District civil cases.  This week, we’re looking at the Second District criminal cases. In 1990, the Court decided no Second District criminal cases at all.  In 1991, the Court decided one case from Los Angeles.  In 1992, the Court decided … Continue Reading

Where Did the Supreme Court’s Second District Civil Cases Come From (2005-2019)?

In 2005, Los Angeles produced fifteen civil cases and one was from Santa Barbara.  In 2006, the Court decided eighteen cases from Los Angeles, two from Santa Barbara and one from San Luis Obispo.  In 2007, seventeen cases were decided which originated in Los Angeles and one was from Santa Barbara.  In 2008, the Court … Continue Reading

Where Did the Supreme Court’s Second District Civil Cases Come From (1990-2004)?

Last week, we reviewed the data on how the Supreme Court’s First District civil and criminal cases were distributed among the counties of the District.  Today, we’re looking at the Second District. There are only four counties in the Second District – Los Angeles, Ventura, Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo.  Given that Los Angeles … Continue Reading

Where Did the Supreme Court’s First District Criminal Cases Come From?

Last time, we reviewed the distribution of the First District’s criminal cases at the Supreme Court among the First’s counties between 1990 and 2004.  This time, we’re reviewing the data for the years 2005 to 2019. In 2005, the Supreme Court decided one criminal case each from Alameda, Marin and San Mateo counties.  In 2006, … Continue Reading

Where Did the Court’s First District Criminal Cases Come From (Part 1 of 2)?

Last week, we tracked which county Circuit Courts accounted for the Supreme Court’s First District civil cases from 1990 to 2019.  This week, we’re looking at the criminal side. In 1990, the Court decided one case each from Contra Costa county and Mendocino.  In 1991, the Court decided one case from Alameda, Humboldt and Sonoma.  … Continue Reading

Where Did the Court’s First District Civil Cases Come From (Part 2 of 2)?

Last time, we began reviewing the Supreme Court’s civil cases from the First District, tracking the counties in which the cases originated, five years at a time.  Today we’re reviewing the data for the years 2005-2019. In 2005, the Court decided five cases from San Francisco, two from Alameda and one from Marin.  In 2006, … Continue Reading

Where Did the Court’s First District Civil Cases Come From (Part 1 of 2)?

Last time, we reviewed which Districts and Divisions of the Court of Appeal produced the Supreme Court’s civil and criminal dockets.  This week, we’re drilling down a bit more and looking at the originating trial courts.  Since we reviewed this data about eighteen months ago, we’re looking at it this time in a slightly different … Continue Reading

Which Districts of the Court of Appeal Account for the Court’s Criminal Docket (2005-2019)?

This time, we’re concluding our review of the Court of Appeal Districts and Divisions which accounted for the Court’s criminal docket by reviewing the years 2005 to 2019.  Between 2005 and 2009, the Court decided 22 criminal cases from the First District: 7 from Division 2, 4 apiece from Divisions 1, 4 and 5 and … Continue Reading

Which Districts of the Court of Appeal Account for the Court’s Criminal Docket (1990-2004)?

Last week, we reviewed the Districts and Divisions which accounted for the Supreme Court’s civil docket between 1990 and 2019.  This week, we’re looking at the sources of the criminal docket. Between 1990 and 1994, the Court decided 16 criminal cases from the First District: 5 each from Divisions 4 and 5, 3 from Division … Continue Reading

Where in the Court of Appeal Have the Court’s Civil Cases Come From (2005-2019)?

Civil cases from San Francisco’s First District were down between 2005 and 2009 from 43 to 37.  The Court decided 11 cases from Division 5, 8 from Divisions 1 and 3, 7 from Division 4 and 6 from Division 2. Cases from the Second District were down a bit to 89.  The Court decided 20 … Continue Reading

Which Districts of the Court of Appeal Account for the Supreme Court’s Civil Docket (1990-2004)?

This week, we’re looking at a new subject – updating our data on the Court of Appeal Districts and Divisions which produced the Supreme Court’s docket.  First up – the civil cases. Between 1990 and 1994, the Court decided 45 civil cases from San Francisco’s First District – 1 which we were unable to attribute … Continue Reading

What Can Individual Justices’ Questioning Reveal About the Decision – Criminal Cases 2018

Last time, we reviewed the Court’s oral arguments in criminal cases at the macro level – data on the whole court.  This time, we’re going micro – what can we predict about individual Justices’ votes and writing based on the oral arguments? In Table 1024, we report average questions per Justice in criminal cases.  All … Continue Reading

Is the Party Getting More Questions Likely to Lose – Criminal Cases 2018

In our next two posts, we’re reviewing the data for the Court’s oral arguments in criminal cases during 2018. In all, the Justices asked 1,103 questions of appellants and 896 of appellees. That works out to 22.06 questions to the appellant, and 17.92 to the appellee. We’ve shown before that most argument analytics studies have … Continue Reading

What Can Individual Justices’ Questioning Forecast About the Result – Civil Cases 2018

Justices Cuellar and Liu were the most frequent questioners during civil cases in 2018.  Justice Cuellar averaged 5.42 questions of appellants, 5.94 of appellees and 0.48 in rebuttals.  Justice Liu averaged 4.33 of appellants, 6.15 of appellees and 1.24 in rebuttals.  Justice Corrigan averaged 2.42 questions in appellants, 2.18 of appellees and 0.64 in rebuttals.  … Continue Reading

Is the Party Getting More Questions Likely to Lose – Civil Arguments 2018

This time, we’re looking at the oral arguments in civil cases in 2018.  For new readers, you can review the history of data analytics for oral arguments here. For civil cases decided last year, the Court asked 958 questions of appellants and 889 of appellees – an average of 29.03 questions to appellants and 26.94 … Continue Reading

How Have Challengers to Government Powers, Actions and Procedures Fared Before the Supreme Court Since 1990 (2014-2019)?

The Supreme Court decided thirty-nine government and administrative law cases between 2014 and 2019: three in 2014, eleven per year in 2015 and 2016, nine in 2017, five in 2018 and none so far in 2019. The Court decided twenty-two cases between 2014 and 2019 which were won by the defender of government authority versus … Continue Reading
LexBlog