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Can the Time from End of Party Briefing to Oral Argument Predict Case Results in Civil Cases?

Last week, we investigated whether the lag time from the end of briefing, including amicus and supplemental briefing, to oral argument suggests the likeliest result – in other words, do affirmances or reversals consistently take longer? In Table 1160, we report the lag times from end of party briefing to oral argument, divided by civil … Continue Reading

Does the Time from End of Briefing to Oral Argument Predict the Result in Civil Cases?

In previous posts, we’ve suggested that the period from the end of amicus/supplemental briefing to the oral argument is a reasonable proxy for the Court’s decisional period.  So, if we revisit the data, divided by affirmances, reversals and split decisions (partly affirmed, partly reversed) – can we predict the result based on the wait from … Continue Reading

What’s the Average Time From Argument to Decision in Civil Cases at the Supreme Court?

Today, we’re reviewing the data for the average lag time between oral argument and decision in civil cases at the Supreme Court. During the 1990s, the average time increased significantly.  In 1990, there was an average of 61.56 days’ wait from argument to decision.  That dropped to 59.23 (1991), 56.42 (1992) and 59.26 (1993), before … Continue Reading

How Long Typically Passes from the End of Briefing to Oral Argument in Civil Cases, 1990-2019?

Today, we reach a critical milestone in civil litigation at the Supreme Court: the average lag time from the last brief – regardless of whether it’s a party reply brief, an amicus brief or a supplemental brief – to the oral argument.  Because of California’s rule that cases must be decided within ninety days following … Continue Reading

How Long Does Supplemental and Amicus Briefing Typically Take in Civil Cases, 1990-2019?

Last week we reviewed the data for how long party briefing typically took in civil cases at the Supreme Court.  This week, we’re looking at the next guideposts.  The Supreme Court accepts additional briefs in nearly all its civil cases: amicus briefs; responses to amicus briefs; and supplemental briefs.  How long does extra briefing typically … Continue Reading

How Long Do Civil Cases Average from Grant of Review to Filing of the Appellant’s Opening Brief?

Our next step in our comprehensive review of lag times at the Supreme Court is the average time from the Court’s order granting review to the filing of the Appellant’s Opening Brief.  Absent any extensions, the appellant’s opening brief is due 30 days after the order granting review.  (Rule of Court 8.520(a).) From 1990 to … Continue Reading

Part 2 – How Long After Filing is the Typical Petition for Review Granted in Civil Cases?

Last time, as part of our review of lag time data for civil and criminal cases at the Supreme Court, we reviewed the composite lag time data – grant of review to oral argument.  For this study, we’ve divided lag time data for civil cases by seven guideposts – Petition for Review filed; Petition granted; … Continue Reading

Are Civil Cases Taking Longer – and If So, Why? (Part 1 of a Series)

Today, we’re beginning a new series of posts about an area that’s been controversial for generations: the lag time involved in appellate litigation, and the perception that cases take too long to resolve.  We’ve published lag time data on the blog before divided into only two numbers: days from grant of review to oral argument … Continue Reading

Where Did the Supreme Court’s Sixth District Criminal Cases Come From, 2005-2019?

Today, we’re concluding our survey of the originating trial courts for the Supreme Court’s criminal cases from the Sixth District, looking at the numbers for the years 2005 to 2019. In 2005, the Court decided two criminal cases from Santa Clara county.  In 2006, there were four Santa Clara cases and one each from San … Continue Reading

Where Did the Supreme Court’s Sixth District Criminal Cases Come From, 1990-2004?

Last week, we reviewed the data on which counties accounted for the Sixth District’s civil cases decided by the Supreme Court since 1990.  This week, we’re looking at the criminal cases. In 1990, the Court decided one criminal case each from Santa Clara and Monterey counties.  In 1991 and 1992, the Court decided three cases … Continue Reading

Where Did the Supreme Court’s Sixth District Civil Cases Come From, 2005-2019?

In 2000, the Supreme Court decided three civil cases from Santa Clara county and one from Monterey.  The Court decided two cases from Santa Clara in 2002 and three in 2003, and one case from Santa Cruz in 2004. In 2010, the Court decided five cases from Santa Clara county and one from Monterey.  The … Continue Reading

Where Did the Supreme Court’s Sixth District Civil Cases Come From, 1990-2004?

This week and next, we’re concluding our trip through the data for the counties of California’s six Court of Appeal districts with the civil and criminal cases from the Sixth District.  The Sixth encompasses only four counties: Santa Clara (by far the biggest), San Benito, Santa Cruz and Monterey.  Civil cases from the Sixth District … Continue Reading

Where Did the Fifth District’s Criminal Cases Come From, 2005-2019?

This time, we’re reviewing the most recent data for which trial courts accounted for the Supreme Court’s criminal cases from the Fifth District. In 2005, the Court decided three cases from Kern county and one each from Fresno, Merced, Tulare and Tuolumne counties.  In 2006, the Court decided two cases from Kern and one from … Continue Reading

Where Did the Fifth District’s Criminal Cases Come From, 1990-2004?

This time, we’re reviewing the data on the trial courts which produced the Supreme Court’s criminal cases from the Fifth District. In 1990, the Court decided only one Fifth District criminal case, which originated in Fresno county.  In 1991, the Court decided three cases from Tulare county and one each from Merced and Stanislaus county.  … Continue Reading

Where Did the Fifth District’s Civil Cases Come From, 2005-2019?

In recent years, Fifth District civil cases have continued to be relatively uncommon on the Court’s docket.  In 2005, the Court decided two cases from Fresno and one each from Kern and Stanislaus counties.  In 2006, the Court decided one case from Kern county and one from Tulare.  In 2007, the Court decided one case … Continue Reading

Where Did the Fifth District’s Civil Cases Come From, 1990-2004?

For the past two weeks, we’ve been reviewing the data on which county Superior Courts originated the Supreme Court’s civil and criminal decisions from the Fourth District.  Next up: the Fifth District. The Court decided no Fifth District civil cases in 1990.  In 1991, the Court decided one case each from Fresno and Kern counties.  … Continue Reading

Where Did the Fourth District’s Criminal Cases Come From, 2005-2019?

Today, we’re reviewing the data on the county of origin for the Supreme Court’s Fourth District criminal cases from 2005 to 2019. In 2005, the Court decided four criminal cases which originated in Orange county, two from San Diego and one from Riverside.  In 2006, there was one case from Orange and one from San … Continue Reading

Where Did the Fourth District’s Criminal Cases Come From, 1990-2004?

Last week, we tracked the data for which county trial courts accounted for the Supreme Court’s civil cases from the Fourth District from 1990 to 2019.  This week, we’re looking at the criminal side of the ledger. In 1990, the Supreme Court decided three criminal cases from San Diego county and one from Riverside.  In … Continue Reading

Where Did the Fourth District’s Civil Cases Come From, 2005-2019?

In 2005, the Court decided four cases from San Diego, three from Riverside, two from San Bernardino and one from Orange county.  In 2006 and 2007, the Fourth District’s smallest counties, Imperial and Inyo, finally broke through with their first civil cases since our data begins in 1990.  In 2006, the Court decided four cases … Continue Reading

Where Did the Fourth District’s Civil Cases Come From, 1990-2004?

For the past several weeks, we’ve been looking at the data on which trial courts produced the Supreme Court’s civil and criminal cases for each District of the Court of Appeal, year by year since 1990.  This week, we’re looking at the data for civil cases from the Fourth District. The Fourth District is comprised … Continue Reading

Where Did the Third District’s Criminal Cases Come From, 2005-2019?

Last time, we reviewed the data on which county trial courts originated the Third District criminal cases decided by the Supreme Court between 1990 and 2004.  Now let’s finish up with the years 2005 to 2019. In 2005, the Court decided two criminal cases from Sacramento and one from San Joaquin.  In 2006, the Court … Continue Reading

Where Did the Third District’s Criminal Cases Come From, 1990-2004?

Last week, we reviewed the data on which trial court produced the Supreme Court’s Third District civil cases from 1990 to 2019.  This week, we’re reviewing the Court’s criminal cases from the Third District.  There are twenty-three counties in California’s Third District: Alpine, Amador, Butte, Calaveras, Colusa, El Dorado, Glenn, Lassen, Modoc, Mono, Nevada, Placer, … Continue Reading
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