Supreme Court Lag Times

Today, we’re continuing our review of the death penalty lag time data, looking at the average wait from the filing of the final brief – whether that’s the party reply brief or an amicus or supplemental brief – to the oral argument.

In 1990, the average was 225.23 days. It was 265.92 in 1991, 217.3

Our next milestone in reviewing the lag time data for death penalty cases is the period from the end of party briefing – the filing of the reply brief – to the filing of the last supplemental or amicus brief (including replies to one or the other). Amicus briefs have been very rare in death

This week, we’re continuing our review of the detailed lag time data for the Court’s death penalty cases. First up: the average wait from the order appointing death penalty counsel to filing of the opening brief.

During the 1990s, the average wait from appointment of counsel to the filing of the opening brief increased significantly.

Today, we’re tracking the average lag time from filing of the certified record on appeal to the order appointing direct appeal death penalty counsel. The average wait was 416.35 days in 1990, 735.24 in 1991, 620.48 days in 1992, 743.65 days in 1993, 673.29 days in 1994, 921.31 days in 1995, 542.63 days in 1996,

For the past few weeks, we’ve been reviewing the Court’s lag time data from one case benchmark to the next for both civil and criminal cases. In our next several posts, we’ll be looking at the Court’s recent history with death penalty cases. Today, we’re tracking the lag time between the first two steps in

For the past few weeks, we’ve been tracking the average time between each milestone of civil and criminal cases at the California Supreme Court, year by year since 1990. This time, we’re looking at the average wait from the filing of the last brief to oral argument in criminal cases. As before, for the moment

Yesterday, we reviewed the data for the average wait from filing of the opening brief to filing of the reply brief.  This time, we move to the next step: the average wait from filing of the reply brief to filing of the final brief – amicus or supplemental.

During the 1990s, the relatively few additional

Today, we’re looking at the lag time data for the next step in a criminal case – the wait from the order appointing counsel to the filing of the opening brief (which is generally, but by no means always, by the defendant).  One very big caution with today’s numbers: for this post, we’re covering all