Where Did the Supreme Court’s Sixth District Civil Cases Come From, 2005-2019?

In 2000, the Supreme Court decided three civil cases from Santa Clara county and one from Monterey.  The Court decided two cases from Santa Clara in 2002 and three in 2003, and one case from Santa Cruz in 2004.

In 2010, the Court decided five cases from Santa Clara county and one from Monterey.  The Court decided one civil case from Monterey in 2011, two from Santa Clara county in 2012, and two from Santa Clara and one from Santa Cruz in 2013.

The Court decided one civil case from Santa Clara county in 2015, 2017, 2018 and 2019.  The Court decided one case from Monterey in 2016.

Santa Clara county has 71.52% of the population of the Sixth District and accounted for 76.56% of the civil cases.  Monterey county has 16.08% of the population and 15.63% of the civil cases.  Santa Cruz has been a bit underrepresented on the docket with 10.12% of the population but only 6.25% of the civil docket.  San Benito county has 2.27% of the population and 1.56% of the civil cases.

Join us back here later this week as we address the Court’s criminal cases.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Konrad Summers (no changes).

Where Did the Supreme Court’s Sixth District Civil Cases Come From, 1990-2004?

This week and next, we’re concluding our trip through the data for the counties of California’s six Court of Appeal districts with the civil and criminal cases from the Sixth District.  The Sixth encompasses only four counties: Santa Clara (by far the biggest), San Benito, Santa Cruz and Monterey.  Civil cases from the Sixth District have been comparatively few during our study period.

In 1990, the Supreme Court decided two civil cases from Santa Clara County.  In 1991, there was one case from Monterey.  In 1992, the Court decided three cases from Santa Clara and one more from Monterey.  The following year, there were two cases from Santa Clara and one each from Santa Cruz and Monterey.  In 1994, the Court decided three cases from Santa Clara.

Only Sixth District civil case between 1995 and 1999 originated anywhere other than Santa Clara – a single case from San Benito county in 1995.  Meanwhile there were three cases in 1995, one in 1997, two in 1998 and four cases in 1999 from Santa Clara county.

There was one case from Monterey county in 2000 and one from Santa Cruz county in 2004.  Santa Clara county produced three civil cases in 2000, two in 2002 and three in 2003.  There were no Sixth District civil cases in 2001.

Join us here next time as we review the data for the years 2005 through 2019.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Damian Gadal (no changes).

Where Did the Fifth District’s Criminal Cases Come From, 2005-2019?

This time, we’re reviewing the most recent data for which trial courts accounted for the Supreme Court’s criminal cases from the Fifth District.

In 2005, the Court decided three cases from Kern county and one each from Fresno, Merced, Tulare and Tuolumne counties.  In 2006, the Court decided two cases from Kern and one from Fresno.  In 2007, the Court decided three cases from Tulare county.  In 2008, the Court decided one case from Kings county.  In 2009, there was one case each from Fresno, Kern, Kings and Madera counties.

In 2010, the Court decided one case from Kings county.  The following year, there was one case each from Kern, Kings and Tulare counties.  In 2012, Kern county produced two cases and Madera and Tulare counties accounted for one each.  In 2013, Kern county once again accounted for two cases, while Kings and Stanislaus counties produced one each.

The Court decided no criminal cases at all from the Fifth District in 2015, 2016 or 2019.  In 2017, the Court decided one case from Kern county and one from Tuolumne county.  In 2018, the Court decided one case each from Fresno, Stanislaus and Tulare counties.

Finally, we compare each county’s share of the Fifth District’s population to its share of the civil and criminal caseload.

Fresno county accounts for 27.91% of the population of the Fifth District according to the 2010 census.  By population, it’s arguably underrepresented on the criminal docket, accounting for only 20.51% of the cases, but Fresno produced 37.25% of the civil cases.  Kern county is the reverse: 25.17% of the population, 35.9% of the criminal cases, 25.49% of the civil.  Stanislaus county is imbalanced too: 15.43% of the population, only 3.85% of the criminal cases and 15.69% of the civil cases.  Tulare county has 13.08% of the population and produced 17.95% of the criminal cases but only 7.84% of the civil.  Merced county accounts for 7.71% of the Fifth District’s population but is comparatively rare on the Supreme Court’s docket – 2.56% of the criminal cases, 1.97% of the civil.  Madera county is 4.43% of the population and 6.41% of the criminal cases but has had no civil cases on the Supreme Court docket at all.  Kings county has 4.25% of the population and accounted 6.41% of the criminal cases and 5.88% of the civil cases.  Tuolumne county is comparatively common on the Court’s docket – 1.53% of the population, but 6.41% of the criminal cases and 5.88% of the civil.  Mariposa county is a non-player on the Court’s docket – 0.49% of the Fifth District population, but no civil or criminal cases.

Join us next time as we begin reviewing the data for the Sixth District.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Brian (no changes).

Where Did the Fifth District’s Criminal Cases Come From, 1990-2004?

This time, we’re reviewing the data on the trial courts which produced the Supreme Court’s criminal cases from the Fifth District.

In 1990, the Court decided only one Fifth District criminal case, which originated in Fresno county.  In 1991, the Court decided three cases from Tulare county and one each from Merced and Stanislaus county.  The Court decided no criminal cases from the Fifth District in 1992.  In 1993, the Court decided two cases from Kern county and one each from Fresno and Madera county.  In 1994, the Court decided two cases from Kern county and one from Fresno.

In 1995, the Supreme Court decided one case each from Fresno, Kern and Madera counties.  In 1996, the Court decided two cases from Fresno and one from Kern county.  In 1997, the Court decided one case each from Madera and Tuolumne county.  In 1998, the Court decided one case each from Kern county and Tulare county.  In 1999, there were once again two cases – one from Fresno and one from Tuolumne county.

In 2000, the Court decided one case from Kern county.  In 2001, the Court decided one case from Fresno.  In 2002, the Court decided three cases from Kern county and one each from Fresno, Tulare and Tuolumne county.  In 2003, the Court decided three cases from Fresno, three from Kern, two from Tulare county and one from Kings county.  In 2004, the Court decided only one Fifth District criminal case, from Kern county.

Join us back here next time as we review the data for the years 2005 to 2019.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Sheila Sund (no changes).

Where Did the Fifth District’s Civil Cases Come From, 2005-2019?

In recent years, Fifth District civil cases have continued to be relatively uncommon on the Court’s docket.  In 2005, the Court decided two cases from Fresno and one each from Kern and Stanislaus counties.  In 2006, the Court decided one case from Kern county and one from Tulare.  In 2007, the Court decided one case each from Kings, Merced and Tulare county.  In 2008, the Court decided one case from Tuolumne county.  There were no civil cases from the Fifth District in 2009.

The Court decided no civil cases from the Fifth District in 2010 or 2011.  In 2012 and 2013, there was only one – Stanislaus county in 2012 and Fresno county in 2013.  In 2014, the Court decided one case each from Stanislaus, Tulare and Tuolumne counties.

The Court decided one civil case from Kern county in 2015.  There were no Fifth District civil cases in 2016.  In 2017, the Court decided one case from Fresno.  In 2018, there were three cases from Fresno and one from Kern county.  So far in 2019, the Court has decided no civil cases from the Fifth District.

Finally, we compare each county’s share of the total population of the Fifth District to that county’s share of the civil cases.  Fresno is arguably overrepresented on the docket – it has 27.91% of the population of the Fifth, but 37.25% of the civil cases from 1990 to 2017.  The numbers for Kern county are virtually identical – 25.17% of the population, 25.49% of the civil cases.  Kings county is roughly proportional to population too – 4.25% of the population and 5.88% of the civil cases.  Madera, Mariposa and Merced counties are all comparatively small: 4.43%, 0.49% and 7.71% of the Fifth District – and they’ve had very few cases on the civil docket: none from Madera, none from Mariposa, and 1.97% of the cases from Merced.  Stanislaus county is proportional – 15.43% of the population, 15.69% of the civil cases.  Tulare county is a bit under: 13.08% of the population, 7.84% of the civil cases.  Tuolumne county accounts for only 1.53% of the population but has produced 5.88% of the civil cases.

Join us back here next time as we look at the Fifth District’s criminal cases.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Naotake Murayama (no changes).

Where Did the Fifth District’s Civil Cases Come From, 1990-2004?

For the past two weeks, we’ve been reviewing the data on which county Superior Courts originated the Supreme Court’s civil and criminal decisions from the Fourth District.  Next up: the Fifth District.

The Court decided no Fifth District civil cases in 1990.  In 1991, the Court decided one case each from Fresno and Kern counties.  In 1992, the same: one case each from Fresno and Kern.  In 1993, the Court decided three civil cases from Stanislaus county, two from Fresno and one from Kern.  In 1994, the Court decided two cases from Kern county.

For the past two weeks, we’ve been reviewing the data on which county Superior Courts originated the Supreme Court’s civil and criminal decisions from the Fourth District.  Next up: the Fifth District.

The Court decided no Fifth District civil cases in 1990.  In 1991, the Court decided one case each from Fresno and Kern counties.  In 1992, the same: one case each from Fresno and Kern.  In 1993, the Court decided three civil cases from Stanislaus county, two from Fresno and one from Kern.  In 1994, the Court decided two cases from Kern county.

The Court decided no Fifth District civil cases in 1995.  In 1996, there was only one, which originated in Kern county.  In 1997, the Court decided two cases from Fresno, two from Stanislaus county and one from Kings county.  In 1998, there was one decision from Kern county, and in 1999, there was one from Tuolumne county.

In 2000, the Court decided one Fifth District civil case, from Tulare county.  In 2001, the Court decided two cases from Kern county and one each from Fresno and Kings county.  In 2002, the Court decided one case from Fresno.  In 2003 and 2004, the Court decided one case per year from Fresno and one per year from Kern.

Join us back here next time as we review the data for the years 2005 to 2019 (so far).

Image courtesy of Flickr by Becky Matsubara (no changes).

Where Did the Fourth District’s Criminal Cases Come From, 2005-2019?

Today, we’re reviewing the data on the county of origin for the Supreme Court’s Fourth District criminal cases from 2005 to 2019.

In 2005, the Court decided four criminal cases which originated in Orange county, two from San Diego and one from Riverside.  In 2006, there was one case from Orange and one from San Bernardino.  In 2007, the Court decided four cases each from Riverside and San Diego, three from Orange county and one from San Bernardino.  In 2008, the Court decided four cases from Orange county and two each from Riverside, San Bernardino and San Diego.  In 2009, the Court decided two cases from San Diego and one each from Imperial county and San Bernardino.

In 2010, the Court decided seven criminal cases from San Diego, four from Riverside and two each from Orange and San Bernardino.  In 2011, there were three cases each from Riverside and San Diego counties, two from Orange and one from San Bernardino.  In 2012, the Court decided four cases from San Diego and three each from Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino counties.  The following year, the Court decided three cases from Orange county, three from San Diego, and two each from Riverside and San Bernardino.  In 2014, the Court decided two cases from Orange county, two from Riverside, and one each from Imperial, San Bernardino and San Diego counties.

In 2015, the Court decided four cases from San Diego county, three from Orange, two from San Bernardino and one from Riverside.  The following year, the Court decided six cases from Orange county, four from San Diego and one from Riverside.  In 2017, the Court decided five cases from Riverside, four from San Bernardino, three from San Diego, and one each from Imperial and Orange counties.  In 2018, the Court decided three cases from Riverside county, two from San Diego and one from Orange.  To date this year, the Court has decided three cases from San Bernardino, two from Riverside and one from San Diego.

Although San Diego county had only slightly greater population in the 2010 census than Orange county (29.45% of the Fourth District to 28.07%), San Diego is the leading producer of both civil and criminal cases to the Supreme Court.  San Diego county has accounted for 34.09% of the criminal caseload, while Orange county has contributed 31.44%.  Riverside county, which accounts for 21.59% of the population, has produced 18.56% of the criminal cases.  San Bernardino, which is 19.13% of the Fourth District’s population, has produced only 14.02% of the criminal cases.  Finally, Imperial county, which is 1.6% of the Fourth District’s 2010 population, has accounted for only 1.89% of the Fourth District caseload.  Inyo county, which is 0.16% of the District’s population, has not produced any criminal cases which reached the Supreme Court.

Join us back here next week as we turn our attention to the Fifth District’s data.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Keith Hughes (no changes).

Where Did the Fourth District’s Criminal Cases Come From, 1990-2004?

Last week, we tracked the data for which county trial courts accounted for the Supreme Court’s civil cases from the Fourth District from 1990 to 2019.  This week, we’re looking at the criminal side of the ledger.

In 1990, the Supreme Court decided three criminal cases from San Diego county and one from Riverside.  In 1991, the Court decided three cases from Orange county and one from San Bernardino.  In 1992, the Court decided five cases from Orange county, three from San Diego and one from San Bernardino.  In 1993, the Court decided three cases from Orange, two from Riverside and San Bernardino and one from San Diego.  In 1994, there were six criminal cases from San Diego, four from Orange county, two from Riverside and San Bernardino and one from Imperial county.

In 1995, the Court decided two cases from Orange county, two from San Diego county and one from Riverside county.  In 1996, the Court decided four cases from San Diego and one from Riverside.  In 1997, the Court decided six cases from Orange county, two from Riverside and one from San Diego.  In 1998, the cases were equally distributed – two each from Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino and San Diego.  In 1999, the Court decided three cases from Orange county and one each from Riverside, San Bernardino and San Diego.

The Supreme Court decided seven criminal cases from the Fourth in 2000: five of them originated in San Diego and two in Orange county.  In 2001, the Court decided four cases from Orange county, three from Riverside and two from San Bernardino.  The following year, the Court decided eight cases from San Diego, six from Orange county and one from Imperial county.  In 2003, the Court decided six cases from Orange county, three from San Diego and one from San Bernardino.  Finally, in 2004, the Court decided nine cases from San Diego, two each from Orange and San Bernardino counties and one from Riverside county.

Join us back here tomorrow as we address the data for the years 2005 to 2019.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Alejandro de la Cruz (no changes).

Where Did the Fourth District’s Civil Cases Come From, 2005-2019?

In 2005, the Court decided four cases from San Diego, three from Riverside, two from San Bernardino and one from Orange county.  In 2006 and 2007, the Fourth District’s smallest counties, Imperial and Inyo, finally broke through with their first civil cases since our data begins in 1990.  In 2006, the Court decided four cases from San Bernardino, four from San Diego and two from Inyo county.  In 2007, the Court decided four San Diego cases, three from Orange and San Bernardino, and one each from Imperial county and Riverside.  In 2008, the Court decided eight cases from San Diego and one each from Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino.  In 2009, the Court decided five cases from San Diego, four from Orange county and two from Riverside.

In 2010, the Court decided three civil cases from Orange county and one from San Diego.  In 2011, the Court decided two cases from Orange, two from San Diego, and one from San Bernardino.  In 2012, there were three cases each from Orange and San Diego and one from Riverside.  In 2013, the Court decided one case each from Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino and San Diego.  In 2014, the Court decided only one Fourth District civil case, which originated in Riverside county.

In 2015, the Court decided five cases from Orange county, three from San Diego, two from San Bernardino and one from Riverside county.  In 2016, the Court decided two cases from Riverside and one each from Orange and San Diego.  In 2017, the Court decided four San Diego cases, two each from Orange and San Bernardino and one each from Imperial county and Riverside.  In 2018, the Court decided four cases from San Diego, three from Orange county and two from Riverside.  To date this year, the Court has decided two cases from San Diego and one each from Riverside and San Bernardino.

In Table 1091, we contrast each county’s share of the total population of the Fourth District (using the 2010 census) to that county’s share of the Fourth District civil cases decided by the Supreme Court since 1990.

Imperial county is only 1.6% of the population of the District.  Inyo county is even smaller – 0.16% of the total population.  Each accounts for 0.81% of the civil caseload.  San Bernardino county has 19.13% of the District’s population and 14.57% of the civil cases.  Riverside county has 21.59% of the population and 14.98% of the civil cases.  Orange county accounts for 28.07% of the population and a nearly equal share of the cases – 30.77%.  Finally, San Diego county is the biggest county in the district at 29.45% of the population.  San Diego county produced 38.06% of the civil cases.

Join us back here next week as we turn our attention to the Fourth District’s criminal cases.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Alans1948 (no changes).

Where Did the Fourth District’s Civil Cases Come From, 1990-2004?

For the past several weeks, we’ve been looking at the data on which trial courts produced the Supreme Court’s civil and criminal cases for each District of the Court of Appeal, year by year since 1990.  This week, we’re looking at the data for civil cases from the Fourth District.

The Fourth District is comprised of six counties – Imperial, Inyo, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino and San Diego.  Although the total population of the Fourth is 11.3 million, nearly all of that is in the last four counties I named – Imperial and Inyo account for less than 2% of the total population of the District.  So we expect Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino and San Diego counties to account for the vast majority of the civil and criminal cases from the Fourth District.

In 1990, the Court decided three civil cases from San Diego, one from Orange county and one from Riverside.  In 1991, the Court decided three cases from Orange county, three from San Diego and two each from Riverside and San Bernardino.  In 1992, the Court decided five civil cases each from Orange county and San Diego county.  In 1993, the Court decided six cases from Orange and San Diego, three from San Bernardino and one from Riverside.  In 1994, the Court decided five cases from Orange county, two each from Riverside and San Diego and one from San Bernardino.

In 1995, the Court decided two civil cases from Orange county and one each from Riverside and San Diego.  The following year, there were three San Diego cases and two from Orange.  In 1997, the Court decided three cases from San Diego, two from Riverside and one each from Orange county and San Bernardino.  In 1998, the Court decided four cases from San Diego, four from Riverside, two from Orange and one from San Bernardino.  In 1999, the Court decided three cases from San Diego and two from Orange county and San Bernardino county.

The Court decided two cases from San Diego in 2000, two from Riverside county and one from San Bernardino.  The following year, the Court decided eight cases from Orange county, four from San Diego, two from San Bernardino and one from Riverside.  In 2002, the Court decided three Orange county cases, three from San Bernardino and two each from Riverside and San Diego.  In 2003, there were three cases from San Bernardino, two from Orange and San Diego and one from Riverside county.  In 2004, the Court decided five cases from Orange county, five from San Diego and one from Riverside.

Join us back here next time as we review the data for the years 2005 through 2019.

Image courtesy of Flickr by David Goehring (no changes).

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