Where Did the Fourth District’s Criminal Cases Come From, 2005-2019?

Today, we’re reviewing the data on the county of origin for the Supreme Court’s Fourth District criminal cases from 2005 to 2019.

In 2005, the Court decided four criminal cases which originated in Orange county, two from San Diego and one from Riverside.  In 2006, there was one case from Orange and one from San Bernardino.  In 2007, the Court decided four cases each from Riverside and San Diego, three from Orange county and one from San Bernardino.  In 2008, the Court decided four cases from Orange county and two each from Riverside, San Bernardino and San Diego.  In 2009, the Court decided two cases from San Diego and one each from Imperial county and San Bernardino.

In 2010, the Court decided seven criminal cases from San Diego, four from Riverside and two each from Orange and San Bernardino.  In 2011, there were three cases each from Riverside and San Diego counties, two from Orange and one from San Bernardino.  In 2012, the Court decided four cases from San Diego and three each from Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino counties.  The following year, the Court decided three cases from Orange county, three from San Diego, and two each from Riverside and San Bernardino.  In 2014, the Court decided two cases from Orange county, two from Riverside, and one each from Imperial, San Bernardino and San Diego counties.

In 2015, the Court decided four cases from San Diego county, three from Orange, two from San Bernardino and one from Riverside.  The following year, the Court decided six cases from Orange county, four from San Diego and one from Riverside.  In 2017, the Court decided five cases from Riverside, four from San Bernardino, three from San Diego, and one each from Imperial and Orange counties.  In 2018, the Court decided three cases from Riverside county, two from San Diego and one from Orange.  To date this year, the Court has decided three cases from San Bernardino, two from Riverside and one from San Diego.

Although San Diego county had only slightly greater population in the 2010 census than Orange county (29.45% of the Fourth District to 28.07%), San Diego is the leading producer of both civil and criminal cases to the Supreme Court.  San Diego county has accounted for 34.09% of the criminal caseload, while Orange county has contributed 31.44%.  Riverside county, which accounts for 21.59% of the population, has produced 18.56% of the criminal cases.  San Bernardino, which is 19.13% of the Fourth District’s population, has produced only 14.02% of the criminal cases.  Finally, Imperial county, which is 1.6% of the Fourth District’s 2010 population, has accounted for only 1.89% of the Fourth District caseload.  Inyo county, which is 0.16% of the District’s population, has not produced any criminal cases which reached the Supreme Court.

Join us back here next week as we turn our attention to the Fifth District’s data.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Keith Hughes (no changes).

Where Did the Fourth District’s Criminal Cases Come From, 1990-2004?

Last week, we tracked the data for which county trial courts accounted for the Supreme Court’s civil cases from the Fourth District from 1990 to 2019.  This week, we’re looking at the criminal side of the ledger.

In 1990, the Supreme Court decided three criminal cases from San Diego county and one from Riverside.  In 1991, the Court decided three cases from Orange county and one from San Bernardino.  In 1992, the Court decided five cases from Orange county, three from San Diego and one from San Bernardino.  In 1993, the Court decided three cases from Orange, two from Riverside and San Bernardino and one from San Diego.  In 1994, there were six criminal cases from San Diego, four from Orange county, two from Riverside and San Bernardino and one from Imperial county.

In 1995, the Court decided two cases from Orange county, two from San Diego county and one from Riverside county.  In 1996, the Court decided four cases from San Diego and one from Riverside.  In 1997, the Court decided six cases from Orange county, two from Riverside and one from San Diego.  In 1998, the cases were equally distributed – two each from Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino and San Diego.  In 1999, the Court decided three cases from Orange county and one each from Riverside, San Bernardino and San Diego.

The Supreme Court decided seven criminal cases from the Fourth in 2000: five of them originated in San Diego and two in Orange county.  In 2001, the Court decided four cases from Orange county, three from Riverside and two from San Bernardino.  The following year, the Court decided eight cases from San Diego, six from Orange county and one from Imperial county.  In 2003, the Court decided six cases from Orange county, three from San Diego and one from San Bernardino.  Finally, in 2004, the Court decided nine cases from San Diego, two each from Orange and San Bernardino counties and one from Riverside county.

Join us back here tomorrow as we address the data for the years 2005 to 2019.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Alejandro de la Cruz (no changes).

Where Did the Fourth District’s Civil Cases Come From, 2005-2019?

In 2005, the Court decided four cases from San Diego, three from Riverside, two from San Bernardino and one from Orange county.  In 2006 and 2007, the Fourth District’s smallest counties, Imperial and Inyo, finally broke through with their first civil cases since our data begins in 1990.  In 2006, the Court decided four cases from San Bernardino, four from San Diego and two from Inyo county.  In 2007, the Court decided four San Diego cases, three from Orange and San Bernardino, and one each from Imperial county and Riverside.  In 2008, the Court decided eight cases from San Diego and one each from Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino.  In 2009, the Court decided five cases from San Diego, four from Orange county and two from Riverside.

In 2010, the Court decided three civil cases from Orange county and one from San Diego.  In 2011, the Court decided two cases from Orange, two from San Diego, and one from San Bernardino.  In 2012, there were three cases each from Orange and San Diego and one from Riverside.  In 2013, the Court decided one case each from Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino and San Diego.  In 2014, the Court decided only one Fourth District civil case, which originated in Riverside county.

In 2015, the Court decided five cases from Orange county, three from San Diego, two from San Bernardino and one from Riverside county.  In 2016, the Court decided two cases from Riverside and one each from Orange and San Diego.  In 2017, the Court decided four San Diego cases, two each from Orange and San Bernardino and one each from Imperial county and Riverside.  In 2018, the Court decided four cases from San Diego, three from Orange county and two from Riverside.  To date this year, the Court has decided two cases from San Diego and one each from Riverside and San Bernardino.

In Table 1091, we contrast each county’s share of the total population of the Fourth District (using the 2010 census) to that county’s share of the Fourth District civil cases decided by the Supreme Court since 1990.

Imperial county is only 1.6% of the population of the District.  Inyo county is even smaller – 0.16% of the total population.  Each accounts for 0.81% of the civil caseload.  San Bernardino county has 19.13% of the District’s population and 14.57% of the civil cases.  Riverside county has 21.59% of the population and 14.98% of the civil cases.  Orange county accounts for 28.07% of the population and a nearly equal share of the cases – 30.77%.  Finally, San Diego county is the biggest county in the district at 29.45% of the population.  San Diego county produced 38.06% of the civil cases.

Join us back here next week as we turn our attention to the Fourth District’s criminal cases.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Alans1948 (no changes).

Where Did the Fourth District’s Civil Cases Come From, 1990-2004?

For the past several weeks, we’ve been looking at the data on which trial courts produced the Supreme Court’s civil and criminal cases for each District of the Court of Appeal, year by year since 1990.  This week, we’re looking at the data for civil cases from the Fourth District.

The Fourth District is comprised of six counties – Imperial, Inyo, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino and San Diego.  Although the total population of the Fourth is 11.3 million, nearly all of that is in the last four counties I named – Imperial and Inyo account for less than 2% of the total population of the District.  So we expect Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino and San Diego counties to account for the vast majority of the civil and criminal cases from the Fourth District.

In 1990, the Court decided three civil cases from San Diego, one from Orange county and one from Riverside.  In 1991, the Court decided three cases from Orange county, three from San Diego and two each from Riverside and San Bernardino.  In 1992, the Court decided five civil cases each from Orange county and San Diego county.  In 1993, the Court decided six cases from Orange and San Diego, three from San Bernardino and one from Riverside.  In 1994, the Court decided five cases from Orange county, two each from Riverside and San Diego and one from San Bernardino.

In 1995, the Court decided two civil cases from Orange county and one each from Riverside and San Diego.  The following year, there were three San Diego cases and two from Orange.  In 1997, the Court decided three cases from San Diego, two from Riverside and one each from Orange county and San Bernardino.  In 1998, the Court decided four cases from San Diego, four from Riverside, two from Orange and one from San Bernardino.  In 1999, the Court decided three cases from San Diego and two from Orange county and San Bernardino county.

The Court decided two cases from San Diego in 2000, two from Riverside county and one from San Bernardino.  The following year, the Court decided eight cases from Orange county, four from San Diego, two from San Bernardino and one from Riverside.  In 2002, the Court decided three Orange county cases, three from San Bernardino and two each from Riverside and San Diego.  In 2003, there were three cases from San Bernardino, two from Orange and San Diego and one from Riverside county.  In 2004, the Court decided five cases from Orange county, five from San Diego and one from Riverside.

Join us back here next time as we review the data for the years 2005 through 2019.

Image courtesy of Flickr by David Goehring (no changes).

Where Did the Third District’s Criminal Cases Come From, 2005-2019?

Last time, we reviewed the data on which county trial courts originated the Third District criminal cases decided by the Supreme Court between 1990 and 2004.  Now let’s finish up with the years 2005 to 2019.

In 2005, the Court decided two criminal cases from Sacramento and one from San Joaquin.  In 2006, the Court decided four cases from Sacramento and one each from Butte county, Shasta and Yolo.  In 2007, the Court decided only one Third District criminal case, which originated in Placer County.  In 2008, the Court decided four cases from Sacramento, two from El Dorado and one from San Joaquin.  In 2009, the Court decided two cases each from Sacramento and Yolo and one apiece from Lassen, Nevada, San Joaquin and Trinity counties.

In 2010, the Court decided two cases from Sacramento and one case apiece from Butte, Lassen, Trinity and Yuba.  In 2011, the Court decided two cases from Sacramento and one from Sutter.  In 2012, the Court decided three cases each from Sacramento and Yolo counties, two from Lassen, and one each from Placer, San Joaquin and Yuba.  In 2013, the Court decided one case from Sacramento and in 2014, the Court decided three cases from Sacramento.

The Court decided two criminal cases from Sacramento county in 2015.  The Court decided one case each from Plumas, Sacramento and Yolo counties the following year.  In 2017, the Court decided one case from Amador county and one from Sacramento.  In 2018, the Court decided one case each from Sacramento, San Joaquin and Yolo counties.  This year so far, the Court has decided one criminal case from Sacramento and one from Shasta county.

We conclude by comparing each county’s share of population to its share of the Third District’s civil and criminal caseloads.

As we noted last week, mostly due to the presence of the state government, Sacramento county accounts for 72.12% of the civil cases decided from the Third District.  Sacramento is the leading source of criminal cases too, but the number is far lower – only 37.5% of the total cases, a figure closely aligned to its population share.  San Joaquin county had 10.58% of the civil cases and accounts for 11.54% of the criminal cases.  Yolo county is 3.85% of the civil cases and 8.65% of the criminal cases, but only 5.24% of the total population.  Shasta county is next – 3.85% of civil cases, 4.62% of the population, 7.69% of the criminal cases.  Fifth most common on the docket is Placer county – no civil cases at all, but 5.77% of the criminal caseload while accounting for 9.08% of the population.

Eleven of the Third District’s counties have accounted for no civil cases at all before the Supreme Court in the past thirty years.  Seven counties produced no criminal cases.  Five of those seven were also zeroed out on the criminal side: Alpine, Colusa, Modoc, Mono and Siskiyou counties.  The two remaining counties which produced no cases, Calaveras and Sierra, accounted for only a tiny number of cases on the civil side.  Six counties which had zero civil cases produced criminal cases: Amador (0.96%), Glenn (0.96%), Lassen (4.81%), Placer (5.77%), Tehama (4.81%) and Yuba (3.85%).

Join us back here next week as we turn our attention to California’s Fourth District.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Kimberly N. (no changes).

Where Did the Third District’s Criminal Cases Come From, 1990-2004?

Last week, we reviewed the data on which trial court produced the Supreme Court’s Third District civil cases from 1990 to 2019.  This week, we’re reviewing the Court’s criminal cases from the Third District.  There are twenty-three counties in California’s Third District: Alpine, Amador, Butte, Calaveras, Colusa, El Dorado, Glenn, Lassen, Modoc, Mono, Nevada, Placer, Plumas, Sacramento, San Joaquin, Shasta, Sierra, Siskiyou, Sutter, Tehama, Trinity, Yolo and Yuba.

The Court decided no Third District criminal cases in 1990.  In 1991 and 1992, it decided one per year – Placer county in 1991 and Sacramento county the following year.  In 1993, the Court decided two criminal cases from Sacramento and one from Butte.  In 1994, the Court decided one case each from Sacramento, San Joaquin and Yuba counties.

In 1995, the Court decided one criminal case from Glenn county.  The Court decided no criminal cases from the Third District in 1996.  It decided two in 1997 – one each from Shasta and Tehama.  In 1998, the Court decided one case from San Joaquin.  In 1999, the Court decided two cases from San Joaquin and one from Yuba county.

In 2000, the Court decided one criminal case from San Joaquin county.  In 2001, the Court decided two cases apiece from Sacramento and Tehama counties and one from San Joaquin, Shasta and Yolo.  In 2002, the Court decided two cases from Placer county and one from Sacramento and Shasta.  In 2003, the Court decided one case each from El Dorado, Lassen, Placer, Shasta and Tehama.  The following year, the Court decided three criminal cases from Sacramento, two from Shasta and one each from Butte, El Dorado, San Joaquin, Tehama and Trinity counties.

Join us back here tomorrow as we finish our review with the years 2005 to 2019.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Soomness (no changes).

Where Did the Third District’s Civil Cases Come From, 2005-2019?

In 2005, the Court decided five civil cases which originated in Sacramento and two from El Dorado.  In 2006, the Court decided five Sacramento cases and one each from Shasta and Sierra.  The following year, five cases originated in Sacramento and one each came from San Joaquin, Shasta and Sutter.  In 2008, four cases came from Sacramento and one from San Joaquin.  In 2009, the Court decided three cases from Sacramento and one each came from San Joaquin and Yolo counties.

In 2010, the Court decided one case from Sacramento, one from San Joaquin and one from Yolo county.  From 2011 to 2013, the Court’s only Third District cases came from Sacramento – one case in 2011, two in 2012 and one in 2013.  In 2014, the Court decided one case from Sacramento and one from San Joaquin.

In 2015, the Court decided one case from Sacramento county.  In 2016, the Court decided one Sacramento and one from San Joaquin.  In 2017, the Court decided three cases from Sacramento.  The following year, the Court decided one case from Shasta county.  So far in 2019, the court has decided one case from Plumas county.

In Table 1077, we compare each county’s share of the civil caseload to that county’s share of the total population of the Third District.

Sacramento county is by far the biggest county in the Third District, with 36.99% of the total population.  Of the Court’s Third District civil cases, 72.12% have originated in Sacramento.  San Joaquin has 17.87% of the total population, but only 10.58% of the cases.  Placer county has 9.08% of the population, but the Court decided no Placer county civil cases between 1990 and 2019.  Butte county accounts for 5.74% of the population and 0.96% of the civil cases.  Yolo county accounts for 5.24% of the population and 3.85% of the civil caseloads.

Among the smallest counties in the Third, Alpine county has only 0.03% of the total population, and has not produced a civil case for the Supreme Court since 1990.  Sierra county has 0.08% of the population and has produced 0.96% of the civil cases.  Modoc county is 0.25% of the total population and produced no civil cases between 1990 and 2019.  Trinity county accounts for 0.36% of the population and 0.96% of the civil cases.  Mono county has 0.37% of the total population and produced no civil cases for the Supreme Court’s civil docket between 1990 and 2019.

Join us later this week as we move on to the Court’s Third District criminal cases.

Image courtesy of Flickr by MoonJazz (no changes).

Where Did the Third District’s Civil Cases Come From, 1990-2004?

Over the past two weeks, we’ve reviewed the Supreme Court’s Second District civil and criminal cases since 1990.  This week and next, we’re looking at the Court’s Third District cases.

The Third District covers twenty-three California counties: Alpine, Amador, Butte, Calaveras, Colusa, El Dorado, Glenn, Lassen, Modoc, Mono, Nevada, Placer, Plumas, Sacramento, San Joaquin, Shasta, Sierra, Siskiyou, Sutter, Tehama, Trinity, Yolo and Yuba.

In 1990, the Court decided three civil cases which originated in Sacramento county.  In 1991, the Court decided three Sacramento cases and one from Yolo county.  In 1992, the Court decided four cases from Sacramento.  In 1993, the Court decided one Sacramento case, and in 1994, the Court decided one Sacramento case and one Trinity county case.

In 1995, the Court decided four civil cases which originated in Sacramento county.  In 1996, the Court decided five Fourth District civil cases – one each from Butte, Nevada, Sacramento, San Joaquin and Sutter.  In 1997, the Court decided three cases from Sacramento.  In 1998, the Court decided four cases from Sacramento.  The following year, the Court decided four cases from Sacramento, one from Calaveras and one from San Joaquin.

The Court decided two cases from Sacramento and two from San Joaquin in 2000.  The following year, the Court decided two cases from Sacramento and one from San Joaquin.  In 2002, the Court decided two cases from Sacramento county.  In 2003, the Court decided five cases from Sacramento.  In 2004, the Court decided three cases from Sacramento and one each from Shasta and Yolo counties.

Join us back here tomorrow as we review the data for the years 2005 to 2019.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Bureau of Land Management (no changes).

Where Did the Court’s Second District’s Criminal Cases Come From (2005-2019)?

In 2005, the Court decided eight criminal cases from Los Angeles county.  In 2006, the Court decided five cases from Los Angeles and one from Santa Barbara.  The following year, the Court decided a dozen cases from Los Angeles and one from San Luis Obispo.  In 2008, the Court decided another dozen cases from Los Angeles and two from San Luis Obispo.  In 2009, the Court decided seven cases from Los Angeles and one from Ventura.

In 2010, the Court decided ten criminal cases from Los Angeles, two from Ventura and one from San Luis Obispo.  In 2011, the Court decided three cases from L.A. and two from Ventura.  The following year, the Court decided nine cases from Los Angeles and one from Ventura.  In 2013, the Court decided eight cases from Los Angeles and one from Santa Barbara.  In 2014, the Court decided nine cases from Los Angeles and two from Ventura.

In 2015, the Court decided three cases from Los Angeles and one from San Luis Obispo.  In 2016, the Court decided eight cases from Los Angeles.  In 2017, the Court decided eight cases from Los Angeles and one from Santa Barbara.  In 2018, the Court decided six cases from Los Angeles and one from Ventura.  In 2019, the Court has decided one case from L.A. and one from Ventura.

In Table 1070, we review each county’s share of the total population of the Second District, each county’s fraction of the total civil caseload of the District, and each county’s fraction of the total criminal caseload.

Los Angeles county accounts for 86.62% of the total population of the Second District according to the 2010 census.  Los Angeles had 91.79% of the civil case load, and 87.45% of the criminal case load.  Ventura county is 7.26% of the population, but only 2.74% of the civil cases.  Ventura is 6.84% of the criminal cases.  Santa Barbara is 3.74% of the total population, 4.21% of the civil case load and 3.04% of the criminal cases.  San Luis Obispo accounts for 2.38% of the population, 1.26% of the civil cases and 2.67% of the criminal cases.

Join us back here next week as we turn our attention to another District’s data.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Sam Howzit (no changes).

Where Did the Court’s Second District Criminal Cases Come From (1990-2004)?

Last week, we examined the data for the county-by-county spread of the Supreme Court’s Second District civil cases.  This week, we’re looking at the Second District criminal cases.

In 1990, the Court decided no Second District criminal cases at all.  In 1991, the Court decided one case from Los Angeles.  In 1992, the Court decided four Los Angeles cases.  The following year, the Court decided five cases from Los Angeles and one from Ventura county.  In 1994, the Court decided five cases from L.A.

In 1995, the Court decided four criminal cases from Los Angeles and three from Ventura.  In 1996, the Court decided five cases from Los Angeles and one from Santa Barbara.  In 1997 and 1998, the Court decided six and ten cases, respectively, from Los Angeles.  The Court decided one case from Santa Barbara in 1998.  In 1999, the Court decided eleven cases from Los Angeles, three from Santa Barbara and one from San Luis Obispo.

The Court decided nineteen cases from Los Angeles in 2000, fifteen in 2001, sixteen in 2002, eleven in 2003 and nine in 2004.  The Court decided two cases from Ventura county in 2000 and one each in 2001 and 2002.  The Court decided one case from San Luis Obispo in 2004.

Join us tomorrow as we review the Court’s data for the years 2005 to 2019.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Bureau of Land Management (no changes).

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