This time, we’re reviewing the Chief Justice’s opinions.

Since joining the Court, Chief Justice Cantil-Sakauye has written 49 majority opinions in civil cases.  She has written seven concurring opinions and only four dissents.  Only once has she written more than one civil dissent in a given year – two in 2019.  The same is true of concurrences – two in 2020.  Her heaviest year for civil majorities was 2018, when she wrote eight.  She wrote seven in 2015 and 2019, and a low of two in 2014.

The Chief Justice has written 81 majority opinions in criminal cases, five concurring opinions and nine dissents.  Her heaviest year for criminal dissents was 2015 with three.  She has written two criminal concurrences so far in 2021, her highest year to date.  Her heaviest years for majority opinions in criminal cases were 2012 (12) and 2013 (10).  She wrote only four per year in 2017 and 2018.

Join us back here on Thursday morning as we continue our review of the Chief Justice’s tenure.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Rick Rowland (no changes).

This week, we’re continuing our review of the individual Justices’ tenures.  Next up: Chief Justice Tani Cantil-Sakauye.

The Chief Justice has participated in 332 civil cases since joining the Court in 2011 (note that we’re applying the same cut-off date for all Justices’ 2021 cases).  Her heaviest full year was 2017, when she sat on 42 civil cases.  Her lightest full year was 2014, when she sat on 23 civil cases.

The Chief Justice has participated in 519 criminal cases since taking her seat.  Her highest total was in 2012, when she participated in 74 criminal cases.  Her lightest full years were 2019 (41), 2017 and 2020 (42 each).

Join us back here next time as our series continues.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Jason Hollinger (no changes).

Today, we’re completing our six-part review of Justice Corrigan’s tenure.  Justice Corrigan has so far written 131 majority opinions in criminal law cases and 15 dissents.

Justice Corrigan has written forty-five majority opinions in death penalty cases.  She has written 24 majorities in criminal procedure cases, 15 sentencing law cases, a dozen constitutional law cases, twelve cases involving juvenile justice, ten cases involving violent crimes, two involving property crimes and one involving mental health issues.

Justice Corrigan has written four majority opinions in cases involving sex offenses, three in habeas corpus cases and one majority opinion each in cases involving drug offenses, attorney regulation and political crimes.

Justice Corrigan has written four dissents in death penalty cases.  She has written three dissents each in constitutional law and habeas corpus cases.  She has written two dissents in sentencing law cases and one each in cases involving violent crimes, criminal procedure and sex offenses.

Join us back here next week as we begin our review of another Justice’s tenure.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Gary Campbell-Hall (no changes).

Today and tomorrow, we’re concluding our six-part review of the tenure of Justice Carol Corrigan of the Supreme Court.  Justice Corrigan has written 83 majority opinions in civil cases and 14 dissents.  She has written 20 opinions in civil procedure cases, 14 involving government and administrative law, nine each in employment law and tort law cases, seven involving environmental law, five in arbitration cases, two in cases involving contract law and one in a domestic relations case.

Justice Corrigan has written four majority opinions each in cases involving constitutional and tax law.  She has written three cases involving commercial law, two in workers compensation cases and one each in cases involving wills & estates, insurance law and election law.

Justice Corrigan has written four dissents in civil procedure cases, three in tort cases, two each in environmental law and constitutional law cases and one apiece in cases involving wills & estates, government and administrative law and arbitration.

Join us back here tomorrow as we complete our review of Justice Corrigan’s tenure.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Peter Kaminski (no changes).

 

Across her entire tenure, Justice Corrigan has voted with the majority in 94.04% of civil cases.  She has reached 100% twice – in 2018 and so far in 2021.  She has been in the majority more than 95% of the time (but less than 100%) five times – 2006 (95.74%), 2009 (97.62%), 2012 (96.15%), 2014 (95.65%) and 2020 (96.3%).  She has fallen below the ninety percent mark twice – in 2010 (89.47%) and 2016 (86.11%).

Justice Corrigan has voted with the majority in 97.36% of her criminal cases.  She has reached 100% four times – in 2007, 2009, 2011 and 2020.  She has been at 95% (but less than 100%) in nine years – 2006 (95.24%), 2008 (98.48%), 2010 (97.26%), 2012 (98.7%), 2013 (96%), 2014 (98.18%), 2015 (97.67%), 2017 (95.24%) and 2018 (95.92%).  Justice Corrigan’s lowest full year was 2019, when she voted with the majority in 92.68% of criminal cases.

Join us back here next week as we conclude our six-part post on Justice Corrigan’s tenure.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Dennis Jarvis (no changes).

In the next two posts, we’re reviewing Justice Corrigan’s voting record.

Since joining the Court, Justice Corrigan has voted to reverse in full in 283 civil cases.  She has cast split votes (affirm in part, reverse/vacate in part – denoted in the chart as “AR” votes) 44 times.  She has voted to affirm in 188 civil cases.  Justice Corrigan’s heaviest year for reversals was 2007 with 30.  Her lightest year for affirm votes was 2020 with only five.  Including both outright reversal and split votes, the outliers are 2006 (32 reverse or AR, 14 affirm), 2007 (34 reverse or AR, 17 affirm), 2010 (22 reverse or AR, 11 affirm), 2011 (23 reverse or AR, 6 affirm), 2012 (18 reverse or AR, 8 affirm), 2015 (24 reverse or AR, 8 affirm) and 2020 (17 reverse or AR, 5 affirm).

Meanwhile, Justice Corrigan has cast 472 votes to affirm in full in criminal cases.  She has cast 106 split votes and voted to reverse 254 times.  Her split votes reached double figures in 2012 (13) and 2014-2016 (10 per year).  The outlier years are 2007 (39 affirm, 21 reverse or AR), 2010 (47 affirm, 26 reverse or AR), 2011 (34 affirm, 17 reverse or AR) and 2018 (30 affirm, 19 reverse or AR).

Join us back here next time as we reach part 4 of our post – how often does Justice Corrigan vote with the majority?

Image courtesy of Flickr by Dennis Jarvis (no changes).

Last time, we began a six-part post reviewing the tenure (to date) of Justice Carol Corrigan. This time, we’re reviewing Justice Corrigan’s record in opinion writing.

Through the end of last week, Justice Corrigan has written 83 majority opinions in civil cases.  She has filed only five concurrences and 14 dissents.  Her heaviest year for dissents was 2007 with 3; she has not written a civil dissent since 2017.  Her heaviest years for majority opinions were 2007 and 2017 with 9 each and 2019 with 8.  Her lightest full year was 2010, when she wrote only one.

Justice Corrigan has written 135 majority opinions in criminal, quasi-criminal, juvenile justice and mental health cases.  She has written 11 concurrences and only 16 dissents.  She has never had more than two criminal dissents in a single year.  She filed three concurrences in her first year, 2006.

Justice Corrigan has reached double figures in criminal majority opinions eight times – 2009 (13), 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2019 (12 each) and 2007 and 2008 (10 each).  Her lightest full year was 2006, with three majority opinions.  She has written four so far this year and wrote five each in 2015 and 2016.

Join us back here next time as we continue our review of Justice Corrigan’s tenure.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Ken Lund (no changes).

 

This week, we’ll begin a series of posts reviewing the tenure of each Justice of the Supreme Court.  Similar to our recently completed review of former Justice Cuéllar’s tenure, we’ll devote six parts to each Justice.  Although technically the Chief Justice is always the senior member of the Court, we’ll take the serving Justices in length-of-service order, beginning this week with Justice Carol Corrigan.

Since joining the Court in 2006 (through the end of last week), Justice Corrigan has participated in 554 civil cases.  Her busiest year was 2007 with 53 cases.  She also participated in 47 cases in 2006, 42 in 2009 and 41 in 2017.  Her lightest full year to date was 2014, with 23 cases.

Justice Corrigan has participated in 834 criminal, quasi-criminal, juvenile justice and mental health cases.  Her heaviest year was 2012 with 77 cases.  She participated in 73 cases in 2010 and was in the sixties in 2008 (66), 2009 (61) and 2007 (60).  Her lightest full year to date was 2019 with 41 cases.

Join us back here next time as we continue our review of Justice Corrigan’s tenure.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Giuseppe Milo (no changes).

This time, we’re concluding our six-part post on the tenure of Justice Mariano-Florentino Cuéllar with a look at the subjects of his majority and dissenting opinions in criminal, quasi-criminal, juvenile justice and mental health cases.

Not surprisingly, the most frequent topic of Justice Cuéllar’s majority opinions in criminal cases was death penalty law.  He wrote 13 opinions in all – 3 in 2016, 5 in 2018, 2 each in 2019 and 2021 and one in 2020.  He wrote eight opinions about sentencing law – two each in 2015 and 2017 and one in 2016, 2018, 2019 and 2020.  Justice Cuéllar wrote seven opinions on criminal constitutional law – 4 in 2017 and one each in 2018, 2020 and 2021.  He wrote three majority opinions regarding political crimes, three in 2015 and one in 2016.  He wrote three majorities on criminal procedure – one each in 2016, 2018 and 2021.  He wrote two opinions about property crimes (both in 2016), two about violent crimes (2018 and 2019) and two about juvenile offenses (2019 and 2021).  He wrote one majority opinion about habeas corpus law and one about sexual offenses.

Justice Cuéllar wrote only nine dissents in criminal cases.  Two-thirds of those were in death penalty cases – two each in 2017 and 2019 and one each in 2015 and 2018.  He wrote one dissent each in criminal procedure (2017), sentencing law (2017) and constitutional law (2018).

Join us back here later this week as we turn our attention to a new topic.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Harold Litwiler (no changes).

This week, we’re reviewing the written opinions of Justice Cuéllar’s seven-year tenure.  The most frequent topics for his majority opinions in civil cases were government and administrative law and civil procedure, with six opinions each.  Justice Cuéllar wrote two government and administrative law majority opinions in 2016 and 2018 and one each in 2019 and 2020.  He wrote two majorities about civil procedure in 2017 and 2019 and one each in 2020 and 2021.  Justice Cuéllar wrote four majority opinions about tort law – one each in 2017, 2019, 2020 and 2021.  He wrote one majority opinion each about environmental law (2015), employment (2016), constitutional law (2017), contract law (2018), bankruptcy law (2018), construction law (2018) and arbitration (2019).

Justice Cuéllar wrote only seven civil dissents.  Three dealt with employment law – one in 2019 and two in 2021.  Two were about environmental law – one each in 2016 and 2017.  He wrote one dissent relating to government and administrative law, in 2016 and one on constitutional law, in 2017.

Join us back here next time as we review Justice Cuéllar’s criminal opinions.

Image courtesy of Flickr by TomH2323 (no changes).