Turning finally to the Sixth District, according to the 2020 census, Santa Clara County was 73.17% of the population.  Monterey County accounted for 16.59% of the population among the three counties contributing cases to the docket and Santa Cruz was 10.24%.

Santa Clara County had cases on the Supreme Court’s civil docket in seven of the ten years of the decade – a total of thirteen cases in all.  Monterey County had only three cases for the decade and Santa Cruz County contributed only one.

Join us back here next week as we begin our analysis of a new topic.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Charlie Day (no changes).

With this post, we turn our attention to the Fifth District.  Fresno (33.63%) and Kern counties (30.31%) comprise a large slice of the District’s population.  Stanislaus County is 18.43%, Tulare is 15.77% and Tuolumne County is 1.85%.

Fifth District civil cases were relatively uncommon on the Court’s docket between 2010 and 2019.  Fresno County had five cases.  Kern County had only two.  Stanislaus County had two and Tuolumne had one.

Next up – we wrap up this multi-part post with a review of the data for the Sixth District.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Sergei Gussev (no changes).

The Fourth District is almost equally divided between three counties – San Diego (29.28%), Orange (28.29%) and Riverside (21.47%).  San Bernardino County accounts for 19.37% of the population and Imperial County is 1.6%.

San Diego County had 24 cases for the decade, sending cases to the Supreme Court’s civil docket in nine of ten years.  Orange County had twenty cases.  Riverside County had 11.  San Bernardino County accounted for seven cases and Imperial County contributed one.

Next up: the Fifth District.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Eric Chan (no changes).

According to the 2020 census, Sacramento County accounted for 52.94% of the population of the Third District.  San Joaquin County was 26.02%.  Yolo was 7.23%, Butte County was 7.07%, Shasta County had 6.08% and Plumas County was 0.66% of the District.

During the decade, Sacramento County produced 11 cases for the Supreme Court’s civil docket.  San Joaquin County had three cases and the remaining counties – Yolo, Shasta, Butte and Plumas – had one case apiece.

 

Next up, the Fourth District.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Bureau of Land Management, California (no changes).

As we’ve discussed before, Los Angeles County accounts for nearly all of the population in the Second District.  According to the 2020 census, the population of LA County was 10,014,009 – 86.41% of the Second District.  Ventura County was 7.28%, Santa Barbara was 3.87% and San Luis Obispo accounted for 2.44%.

Nearly all of the Second District cases on the Court’s civil docket in the past decade came from Los Angeles County – 128 in all.  Three cases were from Ventura County, Santa Barbara produced two cases and San Luis Obispo County had one.

Next up, the Third District.

Image courtesy of Flickr by faungg’s photos (no changes).

Alameda County remained the biggest county in the First District according to the 2020 census, accounting for 29.56% of the population in the First District.  Contra Costa was next, with 20.49% of the District.  San Francisco was third at 15.36% and San Mateo was right behind at 13.43%.  Sonoma had 8.59%, Solano was 7.97% and Marin County was 4.61%.

As in previous decades, the case distribution did not closely follow the population distribution.  San Francisco had twenty cases on the Supreme Court’s civil docket.  Alameda had fourteen.  Marin County produced six cases, Contra Costa had only three.  San Mateo County produced two cases and Sonoma and Solano counties had one each.

Next up: the Second District.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Alejandro de la Cruz (no changes).

Finally, we reach the final part of this second series of our multi-part post on the geographic origins of the Court’s civil docket.

Santa Clara accounts for 72.45% of the population in the counties with cases on the civil docket in the 00s.  Monterey was 16.88% and Santa Cruz was 10.67%.

Santa Clara had cases on the civil docket in seven of ten years, accounting for 16 cases in all.  Monterey had only four cases and Santa Cruz had two.

Next time, we’ll begin our final part, reviewing the data for the decade 2010 through 2019.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Emmanuel Dyan (no changes).

With this post, we proceed to the Fifth District’s population and case distribution statistics.

Fresno is the biggest county, with 29.16% of the Fifth’s population.  Following that are Kern County at 26.31%, Stanislaus at 16.12% and Tulare at 13.86%.  Merced has 8.02% of the population, Kings County accounts for 4.79% and Tuolumne County is 1.74%.

Fresno County narrowly led, producing six cases for the civil docket (although things were fairly quiet across the decade.  Kern County produced five cases, Tulare County accounted for four and Kings County had three.  Merced and Stanislaus County had one case each make the Supreme Court’s civil docket.

Next time we’ll wrap up this part of the multi-part post with a look at the data for the Sixth District.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Emmanuel Dyan (no changes).

For the years 2000 through 2009, San Diego was 29.41% of the Fourth District population.  Orange County had 28.6%, Riverside County was 20.81% and San Bernardino was 19.34%.  Imperial County was 1.66% and Inyo County was 0.18%.

San Diego had civil cases reach the Supreme Court every year, totaling 38 for the decade.  Orange County produced 27 cases.  San Bernardino had 17, Riverside County had 14 and Imperial and Inyo counties produced one case each.

Next up, we’ll review the data for the Fifth District.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Su-May (no changes).

As shown in the Table, the population in the Third District is largely concentrated in two counties – Sacramento (51.38%) and San Joaquin (24.82%).  Behind them, Yolo County is 7.27%, El Dorado is 6.56%, Shasta County is 6.42% and Sutter County is 6.42%.  According to the 2010 census, Sierra County had 3,240 people – 0.12% of the Third District population.

Sacramento County accounted for 36 cases between 2000 and 2009.  San Joaquin County had six, Shasta County had three, Yolo and El Dorado counties had two cases apiece and Sutter and Sierra counties produced one case each.

Next up, we’ll review the data for the Fourth District.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Joshua Tree National Park (no changes).