This time, we’re reviewing the reversal rates for the Divisions of the Second District in civil cases from 2010 through 2019.

Overall for Second District cases, the reversal rates were 100% in wills and estates, domestic relations and property law cases.  The reversal rate was 80% for arbitration law and commercial law.  The rate was 75% for insurance law, 64.71% in employment law, 63.64% for tort law and 60% in government, environmental and constitutional law.  In civil procedure law, the reversal rate was 58.62%.  The rate was 50% in tax law and zero in workers compensation.

The reversal rate in employment law cases was 100% for Divisions One and Four, 50% in Divisions Six and Eight, 33.3% in Division Three and zero in Divisions Two and Seven.  In tort cases, the reversal rate for the decade was 100% in Divisions Six and Eight, 75% in Division One, two-thirds for Divisions Three and Four, 50% in Division Seven and 42.9% in Division Five.  Six Divisions had reversal rates of 100% in government and administrative law – Four, Five, Six, Seven and Eight.  Division One was at 50%, Division Three was at 33.3% and the reversal rate for Division Two was zero.  Divisions Two and Six had reversal rates of 100% in constitutional law cases.  Two-thirds of constitutional law cases from Division Three were reversed.  The rate was 50% for Divisions One and Five and zero in Division Four.  The reversal rate in civil procedure cases was 75% in Division Three, 71.4% in Division One, two-thirds in Divisions Five and Eight, 50% in Division Four and 33.3% in Division Two.

Join us next time as we review the data for the Third, Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Districts.

Image courtesy of Flickr by zoxcleb (no changes).

For the years 2010 through 2019, overall reversal rates for First District civil cases were 100% in insurance cases, environmental law, arbitration, tax, commercial law and election law.  The reversal rate in tort was 80%.  The rate for employment law cases was 71.4%.  Two-thirds of domestic relations cases were reversed.  The reversal rate for civil procedure cases was 53.9% and the reversal rate for government and administrative law was 50%.

All of the tort cases from Divisions Three and Four of the First District were reversed.  The reversal rate for Division Five was zero.  The reversal rate for Division Two of the First in employment law cases was 100%; the rate was two-thirds in Divisions Three and Four.  For civil procedure cases, the reversal rate was 100% in Divisions Three and Five, 80% in Division Four, 33.3% in Division One and zero in Division Two.  The reversal rate in government and administrative law cases was 100% for Divisions Four and Five of the First District and zero for Divisions Two and Three.

Join us back here next time as we proceed to the data for the Second District.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Gallant’s Photography (no changes).

Overall reversal rates for the years 2000-2009 in wills and estates law, environmental law and election law were 100%.  The reversal rate for government and administrative law cases was 74.19%.  The rate for employment law cases was 73.68%.  The rate for domestic relations and arbitration law was 71.43%.  Working our way down the line, the reversal rate was two-thirds in tax cases, 61.29% for constitutional law, 50% for civil procedure and insurance, 37.5% in commercial law, 35.71% for tort cases and one-third for contract law cases.  The reversal rate for property law cases was 25% and the overall reversal rate for workers compensation cases was 20%.

For government and administrative law, individual reversal rates were 100% for the Fifth District, 80% for the Third District and Division Two of the Fourth, two-thirds for Division One of the Fourth and the Sixth District and 50% for Division Three of the Fourth.  For employment law cases, Division One of the Fourth, the Fifth District and the Sixth District all had reversal rates of 100%.  The reversal rate of the Third District was 77.78%.  The rate was 50% for Division Two of the Fourth and zero for Division Three of the Fourth.  Three courts had reversal rates of 100% in domestic relations cases – Division Two of the Fourth District, Division Three of the Fourth and the Sixth District.  The reversal rates for the Third District and Division One of the Fourth were 50%.  In constitutional law, the reversal rate for Division Three of the Fourth District was 100%.  Three-quarters of constitutional law decisions from Division One of the Fourth District was 75%.  The rate for the Third District was 69.23%.  Two-thirds of decisions from Division Three of the Fourth District were reversed and half of the decisions from the Sixth District were reversed.  Reversal rates for civil procedure cases were all over the map: 100% for the Sixth District, 50% for Divisions One and Three of the Fourth, 37.5% for the Third District, 20% for Division Two of the Fourth and zero for the Fifth District.

Reversal rates for tort cases varied widely too: 100% for the Third District, 75% for the Fifth District, 50% for Division Three of the Fourth District and the Sixth District, 18.18% for Division One of the Fourth District and zero for Division Two of the Fourth.

Join us back here later this week as we begin reviewing the data for the years 2010 through 2019.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Celine Nadeau (no changes).

This time, we’re reviewing the data for reversal rates on civil cases from the Second District between 2000 and 2009.

All the contract law cases from the Second District during these years were reversed.  The reversal rate was 85.7% for workers compensation and 83.3% for commercial law cases.  The reversal rate in arbitration was 77.8%.  Three-quarters of domestic relations and tax law cases were reversed.  The reversal rate for constitutional law was 73.3%.  The reversal rate was 64.3% for tort and 62.5% for insurance law cases.  The reversal rate for government and administrative law cases was 56.5%.  Employment law cases were reversed at a 54.6% clip.  The rate for civil procedure was 52.6% and half of wills and estate cases were reversed.  A third of the environmental law cases were reversed and the only secured transactions case was affirmed.

Tort law reversal rates in Divisions were all over the place – 100% in Divisions Two and Seven, 85.7% in Division Three, 50% in Division Eight, one-third in Divisions Four and Six, 25% in Division Five and zero in Division One.  For government and administrative law, same thing – 100% for Divisions Two Five and Seven, three-quarters in Division Four, 37.5% in Division Three, one-third in Division Six and zero (again) in Division One.  Employment law reversal rates were equally scattered – 100% in Division Three, 75% in Division Seven, two-thirds in Division One, half in Divisions Two, Four, Five and Six and zero in Division Eight.  Civil procedure – same thing: 100% in Division Six, 80% in Division Seven, two-thirds in Division One, half in Divisions Three, Four, Five and Eight, and zero in Division Two.  For insurance law, the reversal rate was 100% in Divisions One, Two and Four, half in Divisions Three and Five and zero in Division Seven.

For constitutional law, the reversal rate was 100% in Division Five, 80% in Division Four, three-quarters in Division One, two-thirds in Division Seven and half in Division Two.  Three Divisions had a 100% reversal rate in arbitration cases – One, Three and Five.  Divisions Two and Five had a 100% reversal rate in tax law cases.  For workers compensation, Divisions Four, Five and Six had 100% reversal rates, while Division Three was at two-thirds.

Join us back here next time as we review the data for the rest of the state for the years 2000 through 2009.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Karen (no changes).

Today, we’re reviewing civil reversal rates by area of law for the decade of 2000 through 2009.  Tops was the reversal rate in wills & estates and workers’ compensation cases – 100%.  The Supreme Court reversed 80% of the domestic relations cases it heard from the First District.  The Court reversed 77.8% of constitutional law cases and 75% of tax law cases.  Two-thirds of the Court’s environmental law cases were reversed.  The reversal rate in tort cases was 61.1%.  Three-fifths of decisions in arbitration and commercial law were reversed.  The reversal rate for civil procedure cases was 58.3%.  The reversal rate for government and administrative law cases was 42.9%.  One-third of employment law and property law cases were reversed.  None of the First District cases in insurance law or contract law were reversed.

Next, we review the Divisions of the First District for outliers.  The tort reversal rate was 83.3% in Division Two, two-thirds in Division Three, half in Divisions One and Four and zero in Division Five.  All the government/administrative law cases were reversed in Divisions One and Four.  One-third was the reversal rate in Division Five and none of the cases were reversed in Division Three.  All of the Division One civil procedure cases in Division One were reversed.  The reversal rate was two-thirds in Division Four, half in Divisions Three and Five, and one-third in Division Two.

All the constitutional law cases were reversed in Divisions One and Four.  The reversal rate was two-thirds in Division Five and one-half in Division Three.  All of the commercial law decisions were reversed in Division Four; half were reversed in Division Two and none were reversed in Division Three.

Join us back here next time as we review the reversal rate data for Division Two.

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This time, we’re concluding our examination of the reversal rates of the Courts of Appeal in civil cases during the 1990s.  Overall, reversal rates were 100% with respect to property law, contract law and arbitration.  Government and administrative law and domestic relations decisions were reversed 83.33% of the time.  The reversal rate for insurance was 81.82%.  Three-quarters of workers compensation cases were reversed.  Two-thirds of election law cases were reversed.  The reversal rate for tort cases was 61.8%.  For constitutional law, the reversal rate was 60%.  Half of employment and tax law decisions were reversed.  The reversal rate for civil procedure was 43.33%.  No decisions were reversed in wills and estates, environmental law or commercial law.

Reviewing the district-by-district rates looking for outliers – half the decisions from the Third District in tort law were reversed.  One-quarter of tort decisions from Division One of the Fourth District were, and one third of decisions from Division Two of the Fourth were.  Only 28.6% of government and administrative law decisions from Division One of the Fourth District were reversed.  The reversal rate from the Fifth District was zero.  The reversal rate from the Fifth District in domestic relations was only two-thirds.  The reversal rate in Division Two of the Fourth District was 100%, while the rate in the Fifth District was zero.  The reversal rate in the Fifth District for workers compensation cases was zero, while the rate in Division One of the Fourth and the Sixth District was 100%.

Join us back here next time as we continue our review of the data.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Gary Todd (no changes).

This time, we’re reviewing reversal rates during the 1990s for the seven then-active divisions of the Second District (Division Eight wasn’t created until later).

Overall, 100% of decisions were reversed in environmental law, contract law and secured transactions.  The reversal rate in government and administrative law was 90.91%.  Tort law saw an overall reversal rate of 72.5%.  Two-thirds of domestic relations cases were reversed for the decade.  The reversal rate for property law and workers compensation was 57.14%.  The reversal rate for constitutional law was 52.94%.  Four subjects had 50% reversal rates – civil procedure, insurance law, arbitration and tax.  Forty percent of employment law decisions were reversed.  No decisions were reversed in wills and estates law or commercial law.

Reviewing division-by-division for outliers, reversal rates in tort and government/administrative law were fairly consistent across the board (Division One had nine government cases reviewed during the decade – all nine decisions were reversed).  All Divisions were around the average for civil procedure and constitutional law.  In workers compensation, reversal was 100% from Divisions One and Three, one-third in Division Six and zero in Division Two.

Next up, we’ll review the data for the 1990s for the remaining districts.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Dennis Jarvis (no changes).

Today we’re beginning a new series of posts.  We’re returning to the subject of reversal rates but looking at the data from a slightly different point of view.  This time, we’re considering reversal rates by the area of law addressed in a case.  First up, reversal rates for the First District Court of Appeal for the years 1990 through 1999.

All decisions the Supreme Court reviewed were reversed in property law, contract law and arbitration.  Reversal was 83.33% in insurance law and 80% for environmental and tax law.  The reversal rate for employment law and secured transactions was 75%.  The reversal rate for tort cases was 66.67% and it was 62.5% in civil procedure.  The reversal rate for domestic relations was 57.1%.  Government and administrative law’s reversal rate was 55.56%.  Exactly half of the wills and estates cases from the First District were reversed.  The only reversal rates under half were constitutional law – 35.7% – and commercial law with 0%.

Reviewing the court-by-court numbers for outliers, we see that in tort law, Division Two of the First had a decade-long reversal rate of only a third, while Divisions One and Four were at 100%.  Division Four was also at 100% for government and administrative law, while Divisions One and Two were at 25%.  Divisions Two and Five had 100% reversal rates in civil procedure cases, while Divisions Three and Four were at zero.  For constitutional law cases, Division Four was at 100% reversal; Division One was 66.67%, but Divisions Three and Five were at zero.

Join us back here next time as we review the 1990s data for the Second District.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Giuseppe Milo (no changes).

Justice Jenkins has cast sixteen votes to affirm in criminal cases – fourteen in 2021 and two in 2022.  He has cast two split votes.  He has cast thirteen votes to reverse – eleven in 2021 and two so far this year.

So far, Justice Jenkins has voted with the majority in all thirty-one criminal cases he has participated in.

Join us back here later this week as we continue our review.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Kevin Gill (no changes).

Justice Jenkins has cast twenty-two votes so far in civil cases – eleven to affirm and eleven to reverse.  In 2021, he cast seven votes to affirm and ten to reverse.  He has cast four votes to affirm and one to reverse in 2022 to date.

So far, Justice Jenkins has voted with the majority in 100% of the civil cases he has participated in – all nineteen in 2021 and the first six cases in 2022.

Join us back here next time as we continue our review.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Ken Lund (no changes).