How Many Cases Involving Sexual Offenses Does the Court Decide a Year (1991-2017)?

Last time, we reviewed the Court’s year-by-year load of employment law cases. Today we’re on the criminal side of the docket, looking at the Court’s history with sexual offense cases. Since 1991, the Court has decided forty-two cases which primarily involved such issues.

The Court had no such cases in 1991, two in 1992 and one each in 1994, 1995 and 1997.

The Court decided three cases in 1999, five in 2001 and 2002, two in 2003 and four in 2004.

The Court decided two cases in 2005 but had none from 2006 through 2009. The Court decided two cases each in 2010 and 2011.

The Court had four cases in 2012, four more in 2013, two in 2014 and one each in 2015 and 2017.

Join us back here on Thursday as we take a closer look at the Court’s recent history with employment law cases.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Damian Gadal (no changes).

 

How Many Employment Law Cases Has the Court Decided a Year Since 1991?

Last week, we wrapped up our two-week consideration of the Court’s history with tax cases and attorney disciplinary matters.  This week and next, we’re turning to two new topics: on the civil side, the Court’s history with employment law.  On the criminal side, the Court’s cases primarily involving sex offense issues.

Since 1991, the Court has decided ninety-seven employment law cases.  The Court had none in 1991, but two in 1992, one in 1993, three per year in 1994, 1995 and 1996 and two in 1997.

The Court decided four cases in 1998, two in 1999, five in 2000, two in 2001, six in 2002 and 2003 and four in 2004.

The Court decided five employment law cases in 2005, six in 2006, four in 2007, six in 2008, seven in 2009, nine in 2010 and four in 2011.

The Court decided three cases in 2012, two in 2013, four in 2014, two in 2015, three in 2016 and two in 2017.

Join us back here tomorrow as turn our attention to the Court’s history with prosecutions for sex offenses.

Image courtesy of Flickr by K Conkling (no changes).

How Has the Court Decided Attorney Disciplinary Cases Since 1991?

Last time, we took a close look at the Court’s history with tax law cases – whether the Court more often hears tax challengers’ wins from the Court of Appeal or government’s wins and how often it reverses each side’s wins.  Today, we’re looking at the Court’s attorney disciplinary cases.

It should be pointed out at the outset that the cases which over the years have resulted in full-blown opinions by the Court represent only a small fraction of its attorney disciplinary decisions.  A great many disciplinary matters are dealt with by the Court in unpublished orders. 

Because State Bar disciplinary decisions go straight from the State Bar Court to the Supreme Court, the only cases which can reasonably be said to have been won by the attorney below are attorney admission disputes where the petition for review has been filed by the Bar Examiners.  We report these cases in Table 576 below.  One such decision was reversed in 1995, another was reversed in 2000.  Attorney litigants won one admissions case in 2014 and lost two.

We report the Court’s history with disciplinary cases in Table 577.  The Court decided twenty-one cases in 1991, siding with the Bar in seventeen and reversing at least in part in four.  The Court affirmed three decisions in 1995, one in 1997, 1998 and 2000, four in 2001, two in 2002, one in 2004 and 2005, two in 2014 and one in 2015.

Overall, the Court has reversed, in whole or in part, in only 26.83% of its attorney cases.  The Court reversed in 36% of its cases from 1991 to 1995.  The Court reversed in only 25% of its cases from 1996 to 2000.  The Court didn’t reverse in any of its eight attorney cases from 2001 to 2005, and it didn’t decide any attorney cases from 2006 to 2010.  The Court reversed in 25% of its attorney cases from 2011 through 2017.

Join us back here later this week as we turn our attention to new areas of law.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Ken Lund (no changes).

How Has The Court Decided Tax Cases Since 1991?

Last week, we introduced two new areas of law in our ongoing examination of how the Court selects and decides cases: tax law and attorney disciplinary cases.  This week, we’re taking a deeper look, asking our four usual questions: (1) does the Court take more cases won by one side or the other below? (2) does the Court reverse one side or the other’s wins more often? and (3) irrespective of who won below, does the Court reverse in this area of law more often than in the docket as a whole?  Today: tax law.

The Court’s tax law cases are nearly dead-even between the two sides: 52.94% of the Court’s cases were won by the party challenging the tax below.  Interestingly, the Court’s reversal rate is higher than the docket-wide average for both sides.  The Court has reversed tax challengers’ wins 61.11% of the time, and has reversed government wins in tax cases 62.5% of the time.

In Table 571, we review the yearly totals for tax challengers’ wins affirmed by the Court.  They’ve been few: the Court affirmed one each in 1995, 1999, 2001, 2006, 2013, 2014 and 2017.

The Court reversed one challenger’s win in 1991, two in 1995, one in 2003, 2006 and 2010, two in 2011, and one per year in 2012, 2014 and 2015.

The Court affirmed one government win in a tax case in 1993 and 1994, two in 2006 and one in 2007 and 2009.

The Court reversed two government wins in 1992, one each in 1994 and 1998, two in 2001 and one in 2006, 2008, 2013 and 2017.

Overall, the Court has reversed entirely in 60.61% of its tax law cases since 1991, a rate several points higher than its reversal rate for the entire civil docket.  When we take into account partial reversals, the reversal rate rises to two-thirds.  The Court reversed two thirds of its tax cases between 1991 and 1995.  Between 1996 and 2000, the reversal rate was 50%.  Between 2001 and 2005, the Court reversed in whole or in part in all four of its tax cases.  Between 2006 and 2010, the Court reversed in 62.5% of its tax cases.  Since 2011, the Court has reversed in tax cases exactly 60% of the time.

Join us back here tomorrow as we turn our attention to the Court’s attorney disciplinary cases.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Jeff Turner (no changes).

How Many Attorney Disciplinary Cases Does the Court Decide a Year?

Yesterday, we reviewed the Court’s tax law cases.  Today, we’re taking a closer look at the Court’s cases involving attorney discipline.

For the entire period of 1991 through 2017, the Court decided forty-two attorney disciplinary cases – exactly half of them in 1991 (21 cases).  The Court decided no cases in 1992, 1993 or 1994 and four cases in 1995.

The Court decided one cases in 1997, one in 1998, two in 2000, four in 2001 and two in 2002.

The Court decided two attorney disciplinary cases in 2004, one in 2005 and none from 2006 through 2010.

The Court decided no attorney disciplinary cases from 2011 through 2013, three in 2014, one in 2015 and none in 2016 or 2017.

Join us back here next Thursday as we take a more intensive look at the Court’s tax law cases.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Woody Hibbard (no changes).

How Many Tax Cases Does the Court Decide a Year?

For the past two weeks, we’ve been taking a close look at the Court’s workers compensation cases on the civil side, and its cases involving the elements of violent crimes on the criminal side. This week and next, we’re looking at the Court’s tax law and attorney disciplinary cases. Between 1991 and 2017, the Court decided thirty-three tax law cases.

The Court decided one case in 1991, two in 1992, one in 1993, two in 1994 and three in 1995.

The Court decided one case in 1998, one in 1999, three in 2001 and one in 2003.

The Court decided four tax law cases in 2006 and one per year in 2007, 2008, 2009 and 2010.

The Court decided two tax law cases in 2011, one in 2012, two in 2013 and 2014, one in 2015 and two cases in 2017.

Join us back here tomorrow for a look at the Court cases involving attorney disciplinary law.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Jorge Diaz (no changes).

How Has the Court Decided Cases Involving the Elements of Violent Crimes Since 1991?

Last time, we took a close look at the workers compensation cases the Court has decided since 1991.  Now let’s turn our attention to the criminal docket – specifically, the Court’s decisions involving the elements of violent crimes.  The Court’s cases have been almost equally distributed by winner below – 49.47% of the Court’s cases were won by the prosecution below.  Of course, the reversal rates differ radically – the Court has reversed only 27.66% of prosecution wins it’s heard, but has reversed 81.25% of the defendants’ wins.

First, we address the prosecution wins affirmed by the Court.  The Court affirmed once in 1991, twice in 1994, once in 1995, twice in 1996, once in 1997 and 1998, seven times in 2000, twice in 2001, once in 2002, twice in 2003 and 2004, once in 2005, four times in 2007, once in 2011 and 2012, three times in 2014 and once each in 2016 and 2017.

The Court reversed no prosecution wins in violent crimes cases from 1991 to 1997.  The Court reversed once in 1998, 2000 and 2005, twice in 2007 and 2009, once in 2010, 2011 and 2012, and three times in 2017.

Affirmances of defense wins have been few and far between – one per year in 1994, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2005, 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2016.

The Court reversed three defendants’ wins in 1992, one in 1993, 1994, 1996 and 1997, three more in 1999, one in 2000, three in 2001, two in 2002, one in 2003, two in 2004, one in 2005, three in 2006, two in 2007 and one in 2008.  The Court reversed five defendants’ wins in 2009, one in 2010, two in 2012, four in 2013 and one in 2014.

For the entire period, the Court has reversed in 57.89% of its cases involving the elements of violent crimes.  The Court reversed in six of ten cases between 1991 and 1995, 40.91% of its cases between 1996 and 2000 and 52.63% of its cases between 2001 and 2005.  Between 2006 and 2010, the Court reversed in 85.71% of its violent crime cases.  Since 2010, the Court has reversed in 52.17% of its cases.

Join us back here later this week as we turn our attention to another two areas of the Court’s docket.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Dawn Ellner (no changes).

 

How Has the Court Decided Workers Compensation Cases Since 1991?

Last time, we began our review of the Court’s workers compensation cases on the civil side, and cases involving the elements of violent crimes on the criminal side.  In the next two posts, we’re taking a closer look at those two areas of law.  Since 1991, the Court has heard slightly more employer wins from the Court of Appeal – 54.29% of the total – than employee wins.  The Court has reversed 52.63% of the employer wins it’s heard, but has reversed 62.5% of the employee wins.

Looking at the yearly data, we see one employer win affirmed in 1993, one in 1995, two in 1998, two in 2001, one in 2003 and 2005 and one in 2015.

The Court reversed two employer wins in 1992, one in 19903, one in 1999 and 2000, two in 2001, one in 2007, 2008 and 2015.

The Court affirmed one employee win per year in workers compensation cases in 1991, 1993, 1997, 2001, 2007 and 2013.

The Court reversed one plaintiffs’ win in 1991, two in 1993, one per year in 1996, 1997, 1998, 2000, 2001, 2009 and 2011.

Since 1991, the Court’s reversal rate in workers compensation cases in 60%, slightly above the average in civil cases.  Between 1991 and 1995, the Court’s reversal rate in workers compensation cases was 60%.  Between 1996 and 2000, the Court reversed in two-thirds.  From 2001 to 2005, the Court reversed in four of eight workers compensation cases.  From 2006 to 2010, the Court reversed in three of four.  Since 2010, the Court has reversed in two of four cases.

Join us back here next time as we take a closer look at the Court’s cases involving the elements of violent crimes.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Damian Gadal (no changes).

How Many Cases Involving the Elements of Violent Crimes Has the Court Decided a Year?

Yesterday, we looked at the Court’s history with workers compensation cases.  Today, we’re in the criminal docket, reviewing the Court’s history with cases involving the elements of violent crimes.  The Court has decided ninety-three such cases between 1991 and 2017.

The Court decided one such case in 1991, three in 1992, one in 1993, four in 1994, one in 1995, four in 1996 and three in 1997.

The Court decided two cases in 1998, three in 1999, ten in 2000, five in 2001, three in 2002, two in 2003 and four in 2004.

The Court decided four cases in 2005, three in 2006, seven in 2007, one in 2008, seven in 2009, two in 2010 and two in 2011.

The Court decided five violent crimes cases in 2012, five in 2013 and five more in 2014, two in 2016 and four in 2017.

Join us back here next Thursday as we turn our attention to a deeper look at the Court’s workers compensation cases.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Kai Lehmann (no changes).

How Many Workers Compensation Cases Has the Court Decided a Year?

For the past two weeks, we’ve been taking a close look at the Court’s domestic relations and juvenile justice cases.  This week and next, we’re turning our attention to two new areas of law: workers compensation on the civil side, and on the criminal docket, cases involving the elements of violent crimes.  Between 1991 and 2017, the Court has decided thirty-five workers compensation cases.

The Court decided two workers compensation cases in 1991, two in 1992, five in 1993, one in 1995 and 1996 and two in 1997.

The Court decided three workers compensation cases in 1998, one in 1999, two in 2000, six in 2001 and one in 2003.

The Court decided one workers compensation case in 2005, two in 2007, one in 2008, one in 2009 and one in 2011.

The Court has decided only three workers compensation cases since 2011 – one in 2013 and two in 2015.

Join us back here tomorrow as we turn our attention to cases involving the elements of violent crimes.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Chuck Coker (no changes).

LexBlog