Which Counties Produce the Court’s Criminal Docket (Part 1)?

Yesterday, we reviewed the counties which produced the Supreme Court’s civil docket for the years 1994 through 1998.  Today, we’re reviewing the Court’s criminal docket for the same years.

In 1994, the Court decided nine criminal cases from Los Angeles.  The Court decided six cases from San Diego, three from Orange, Riverside and Santa Clara counties, and two apiece from Kern, San Bernardino and San Mateo counties.  Finally, the Court decided one case from Alameda, Contra Costa, Fresno, Imperial, Placer, Sacramento, San Joaquin, Santa Cruz, Sonoma, West Orange and Yuba counties.

In 1995, the Court decided eleven cases which originated in Los Angeles.  The Court decided five cases from Santa Clara and Ventura counties, four from Orange County, three from San Diego and from the State Bar Court and two from Contra Costa, Kern, Riverside and San Francisco counties.  The Court decided one case from Fresno, Sacramento, Santa Cruz, Butte, Glenn, Lake, Marin, Stanislaus and Madera counties, and one case from the Court’s original jurisdiction.

In 1996, the Court decided seven criminal cases from Los Angeles County.  The Court decided five cases from San Diego and four from San Francisco and Santa Clara counties.  The Court decided three cases from Contra Costa and Sacramento counties and two each from Fresno, Kern, Riverside and Merced counties.  Finally, the Court decided one case each from Orange, Santa Cruz, Marin, Stanislaus, Napa and Santa Barbara counties, and one each from the Court’s original jurisdiction and the Council of Judicial Performance.

In 1997, the Court decided thirteen cases which originated in the trial court in Los Angeles.  The Court decided seven cases from Orange County and three apiece from San Mateo and Santa Clara counties.  The Court decided two cases apiece from Riverside, Sacramento and San Diego counties.  The Court decided one case each from Alameda, Contra Costa, Kern, San Bernardino, Santa Cruz, Marin, San Francisco, Madera, Shasta, Tehama and Tuolumne counties, and one case from the Court’s original jurisdiction.

Finally, we report the data for 1998.  The Court decided fourteen criminal cases from Los Angeles.  The Court decided four cases from Orange County.  The Court decided three cases from Contra Costa, Riverside and San Diego counties, and two each from Kern, Sacramento, San Bernardino and Santa Barbara counties.  Finally, the Court decided one case apiece from San Joaquin, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, Sonoma, Butte, San Francisco, Amador and Tulare counties, and one case from the Court’s original jurisdiction.

Join us back here next Thursday as we turn our attention to the next five years of the Court’s history.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Kelly Hunter (no changes).

 

Which Counties Produce the Court’s Civil Docket (Part 1)?

Last week, we completed our review of the government’s winning percentage in civil cases between 1994 and the present.  This week, we’re beginning a new subject – which trial courts accounted for the Court’s civil and criminal dockets?  First up: the civil docket for the years 1994 through 1998.

In 1994, the Court decided fifteen cases from Los Angeles.  The Court decided five cases from Orange County, four from San Francisco, three from Marin and Santa Clara counties and two each from San Diego, Fresno, Riverside and Santa Barbara counties.  The Court decided one case from each of the following jurisdictions: Sonoma, Sacramento, Lake, Trinity, Humboldt, San Bernardino, Solano, San Mateo, Contra Costa, Ventura and Medocino counties, plus one case each from the Council on Judicial Performance and from administrative entities.

In 1995, the Court decided seventeen cases which originated in Los Angeles County.  The Court decided eight cases from San Francisco, four from Sacramento County and the Council on Judicial Performance, three from Santa Clara County and the Court’s original jurisdiction, and two each from Orange, Santa Barbara, San Mateo and Contra Costa counties.  The Court decided one case each from San Diego, Marin, Riverside, Solano, Ventura, Alameda, Marin, Napa and San Benito counties, and one case whose origin we were unable to identify.

We report the data for 1996 in Table 358.  The Court decided eight cases from Los Angeles that year.  The Court decided three cases from San Francisco and San Diego, two from Orange, San Mateo and Mendocino counties, and one case each from Sacramento, Marin, Santa Barbara, Alameda, Butte, Kern, Nevada, San Joaquin and Sutter counties, and one case originating in an administrative agency.

In 1997, the Court’s civil caseload from Los Angeles doubled to 17 cases.  The Court decided four cases from San Mateo County, three from Sacramento, San Diego and Alameda counties, two each from San Francisco, Fresno, Riverside, Solano, Ventura and Stanislaus counties, and two appeals from administrative agencies.  The Court decided one case apiece from Santa Clara, Orange, Marin, San Bernardino, Kings and San Luis Obispo counties.

Finally, we report the data for 1998 in Table 360 below.  The Court decided seventeen cases from Los Angeles.  The Court decided five cases from San Francisco and four each from Sacramento, San Diego and Riverside counties.  The Court decided three cases from Alameda County and three direct appeals from administrative agencies, and two each from Santa Clara, Orange and Solano counties and from the Council on Judicial Performance.  The Court decided one case apiece from Lake, San Bernardino, San Mateo, Contra Costa, Ventura and Kern counties.

Join us back here tomorrow as we review the Court’s criminal docket for the same years.

Image courtesy of Flickr by SheltieBoy (no changes).

 

How Often Do Governmental Entities Win Their Civil Appeals (Part 4)?

For the past two weeks, we’ve been reviewing the government’s winning percentage as appellant in civil appeals at the California Supreme Court, year by year and by area of law.  Today, we complete our survey, looking at the years 2013 through 2016.

Government appeals were not only a bit less common during these years than in the data we reviewed yesterday for the years 2006 through 2012 – the government’s winning percentage was down a bit.  In 2013, the Court decided only two civil cases in which a governmental entity was the appellant, and the government lost them both – one in government and administrative law and one in tax law.  The government turned it around in 2014, winning its one case in civil procedure and an environmental law case.  In 2015, governmental entities won single cases in government and administrative law and tax law, but lost an environmental law case.  In 2016, governmental entities won one election law case and an environmental law case and lost a single employment law case, but won five of their six cases involving government and administrative law, for a winning percentage of 83.33%.

With the year rapidly nearing its end, let’s close with a quick advance look at the data so far for 2017.  Year to date, government appellants have won five of seven civil cases.  The government has won both its cases involving government and administrative law, plus single cases in environmental law, insurance law and civil procedure.  Governmental entities have lost one case each in constitutional law and tax law.

Join us back here next Thursday as we turn our attention to a new issue in our ongoing study of the California Supreme Court.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Kitty Terwolbeck (no changes).

How Often Do Governmental Entities Win Their Civil Appeals (Part 3)?

Last week, we began reviewing the winning percentage in civil cases of governmental entity appellants, year by year and one area of law at a time.  We began with the years 1994 through 2005.  This week, we’re reviewing the most recent years, starting today with the data for the years 2006 through 2012.

Overall for the period, the government did quite well in its civil appeals, winning 78% of the time.  In 2006, governmental entities won all three cases involving government and administrative law issues, both environmental law cases and the one employment law case.  The government lost its one constitutional law appeal and its one appeal turning on civil procedure issues.  In 2007, the government won both its government and administrative law cases, both its constitutional law cases, and its single appeals in employment, workers compensation and environmental law.  The government won one of two civil procedure cases and lost its one tort law case.  In 2008, governmental entities won all three environmental law cases, both their constitutional law cases, and their one tort law case.  The government won one of two cases involving government and administrative law, but lost its one employment law case.

In 2009, government entities were undefeated in civil cases as appellant, winning two environmental law cases and one case each in government and administrative law, constitutional law, tort law and workers compensation.  In 2010, the government won its lone tax law case and its election law case, split evenly two cases each in constitutional law, employment law and environmental law, and lost its one case involving government and administrative law.  In 2011, governmental entities won three of four civil cases as appellant, winning single cases in tax law, workers compensation and environmental law, but losing one case in employment law.  In 2012, the government won all six of its civil cases as appellant – two in government and administrative law, two in civil procedure, and one each in environmental and tax law.

Join us back here tomorrow as we review the data for the years 2013 through 2016.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Tom Pavel (no changes).

How Often Do Governmental Entities Win Their Civil Appeals (Part 2)?

Yesterday, we reviewed governmental entities’ winning percentage, year by year and area of law by area of civil law, for the years 1994 through 1999. Today, we turn our attention to the years 2000 through 2005.

The government won both of its two cases arising in government and administrative law in 2000, and its one case in employment law. The government won two of three cases in constitutional law, but lost its one civil procedure case. In 2001, governmental entities won their one tax law case, four of six constitutional law cases and two of three government and administrative law cases. The government lost their one workers compensation case and their only environmental law case.

Governmental entities had a good year at the Court in 2002. The government won their single government and administrative law case, both their tort cases and their one employment law case. The government won three of our employment law cases. In 2003, the government won their only case in constitutional, employment and civil procedure law. The government won one of two tort law cases. In 2004, the government won all three of its cases in constitutional law and its sole case in contract law, as well as four of five cases in government and administrative law.

The government had a comparatively rough year in civil cases at the Court during 2005. Governmental entities won their one government and administrative law case, and one of their two constitutional law cases. But the government lost one case each in workers compensation, environmental law, employment and insurance law.

Join us back here next Thursday as we review the government’s won-lost record for the years 2006 through 2016.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Rennett Stowe (no changes).

How Often Do Governmental Entities Win Their Civil Appeals (Part 1)?

For the past few weeks, we’ve been studying appeals brought to the California Supreme Court by governmental entities – specifically, which areas do governmental entities tend to most often appeal in civil cases? This week, we begin our look at the natural follow-up question: how often do governmental entities win those appeals?

We begin with the years 1994 through 1999. In 1994, governmental entities won both their appeals raising questions of government and administrative law, plus their single tort law and judicial discipline cases. The government won two of their three cases in constitutional law. In 1995, governmental entities won their only case in tort law and their one employment law case. They won two of three tax law cases, and two of three civil procedure cases. They won 62.5% of their cases in government and administrative law, and one third of their cases in constitutional law and judicial discipline.

In 1996, the government had a clean sweep, winning all four cases in government and administrative law, both of their constitutional law cases and their one property law case. In 1997, gpvernmental entities won their one tort law case, on case in election law and one case in workers compensation. The government won six of seven cases in government and administrative law – 85.71%, and three of four cases in constitutional law. In 1998, governmental entities won all five of their cases in tort law, plus their one case in constitutional law and their one case in workers compensation. Governmental entities won two of three cases in government and administrative law that year. The government lost one case in judicial discipline and two cases in employment law.

In 1999, governmental entities won both their cases in government and administrative law. They won half their cases in constitutional law, and lost their one tax law case.

Join us back here tomorrow as we address government entities’ won-lost record for the years 2000 through 2005.

Image courtesy of Flickr by DannyMac15_1999 (no changes).

What Areas of Law Does the Government Appeal in Civil Cases (Part 4)?

Last time, we reviewed the areas of the law which governmental entities appealed between 2006 and 2012.  Today, we complete the cycle, reviewing the years 2013 through 2016.

The most striking thing about the Court’s civil docket between 2013 and 2016 as it relates to governmental entity appellants is just how few of them there has been .  All told, the court decided eight cases in government and administrative law brought by government entities during these years, three in environmental law, two in tax and employment law, and one each in civil procedure and election law – that’s it.

Turning to the year-by-year data, the court decided one case in governmental and administrative law in 2013, and one in 2015.  The court decided six cases in 2016.  The Court decided one case per year in environmental law in 2014, 2015 and 2016.  The court decided one case in tax law brought by a governmental entity in 2013, and one in 2015.  The court decided two employment law cases in 2016.  Finally, the court decided one case arising in civil procedure in 2014, and one case arising from election law in 2016.

Join us back here next Thursday as we turn to a new subject.

Image courtesy of Pixabay by BayScholar (no changes).

What Areas of Law Does the Government Appeal in Civil Cases (Part 3)?

Last week, we reviewed the year-by-year data for the areas of law in which the government has appealed from 1990 through 2005. Today, we address the record for the years 2006 through 2012.

Surprisingly, the leading area of law for the court’s governmental entity cases between 2006 and 2012 was environmental law at 12 cases. The court decided eleven cases in governmental and administrative law, eight constitutional law cases, six employment law cases, three cases apiece in tort law, tax law, civil procedure and workers compensation, and one case in election law.

The court decided two environmental law cases in 2006, one in 2007, three in 2008, two per year in 2009 and 2010, and one each in 2011 and 2012. The court decided three governmental and administrative law cases in 2006, two per year in 2007 and 2008, one per year in 2009 and 2010, and two in 2012. The court decided one constitutional law case in 2006, two each in 2007 and 2008, one in 2009 and two in 2010. The court decided one employment law case per year in 2006, 2007 and 2008, two in 2010 and one in 2011. The court decided one civil procedure case in 2006, two in 2007 and two in 2012. The court decided one tort case per year in 2007, 2008 and 2009 and one tax law case per year in 2010, 2011 and 2012. The court decided one workers compensation case each year in 2007, 2009 and 2011. Finally, the court decided one election law case in 2010.

Join us back here tomorrow as we address the years 2013 through 2016 in the court’s appeals by governmental entities.

Image courtesy of Pixabay by AdamCain62 (no changes).

What Areas of Law Does the Government Appeal in Civil Cases (Part 2)?

Yesterday, we began reviewing the areas of law in which government entities have pursued civil appeals since 1994.  Today, we’re addressing the years 2000 through 2005.

Like our previous period, constitutional law and government and administrative law cases dominated the docket of cases appealed by government entities.  Government entities appealed eighteen constitutional law cases, a dozen cases in government and administrative law, five in tort law and four in employment law.  The Court decided three constitutional law cases in 2000, five in 2001, four in 2002, one in 2003, three in 2004 and two in 2005.  The Court decided two government and administrative law cases in 2000, three in 2001, one in 2002, five in 2004 and one in 2005.  The Court decided one tort case in 2001 and two each in 2002 and 2003.  The Court decided one employment law case brought by a governmental entity in 2000, 2002, 2003 and 2005.  The Court decided one civil procedure case per year in 2000 and 2003, one workers compensation case in 2001 and 2005 and one environmental law case in 2001 and 2005.  The Court decided one tax law case in 2001, one contract law case in 2004 and one insurance law case in 2005.

Join us back here next Thursday as we continue our review of the civil cases appealed by governmental entities.

Image courtesy of Pixabay by 12019 (no changes).

What Areas of Law Does the Government Appeal in Civil Cases (Part 1)?

For the past two weeks, we’ve been considering how the Court’s civil and criminal cases were distributed among the Districts and Divisions of the Court of Appeal.  This week, we consider the same issue we began at the Illinois Supreme Court Review earlier in the week – which areas of law did government entities pursue in petitions for review?

Most appeals by the government in civil cases have come in either government and administrative law (26 cases) and constitutional law (17 cases).  After the comes tort law, judicial discipline, tax law, employment and civil procedure, workers compensation and property and election law.  The Court decided two civil cases brought by the government in government and administrative law, eight in 1995, four in 1996, seven in 1997, three in 1998 and two in 1999.  The Court decided three constitutional law cases per year in 1994 and 1995, two in 1996, four in 1997, one in 1998 and four in 1999.  The Court decided one case in tort law per year in 1994, 1995 and 1997 and five in 1998.  The Court decided one case in judicial discipline in 1994, three in 1995 and one in 1998.  The Court decided three tax law cases in 1995 and one in 1999.  The Court decided one employment law case in 1995 and two in 1998.  The Court decided three civil procedure cases in 1995.  The Court decided one workers compensation case per year in 1997 and 1998.  Finally, the Court decided one property law case in 1996 and one election law case in 1997.

Join us back here tomorrow as we address the years 2000 through 2005.

Image courtesy of Pixabay by Larsen9236 (no changes).

LexBlog