Where Did the Supreme Court’s Second District Civil Cases Come From (2005-2019)?

In 2005, Los Angeles produced fifteen civil cases and one was from Santa Barbara.  In 2006, the Court decided eighteen cases from Los Angeles, two from Santa Barbara and one from San Luis Obispo.  In 2007, seventeen cases were decided which originated in Los Angeles and one was from Santa Barbara.  In 2008, the Court decided sixteen cases from Los Angeles and one from Ventura.  In 2009, the Court decided eleven cases from Los Angeles and one from San Luis Obispo.

In 2010, the Court decided thirteen cases from Los Angeles and one from San Luis Obispo.  The following year, the Court decided fifteen civil cases from Los Angeles and one from Ventura.  In 2012 and 2013, all the Court’s Second District civil cases were from L.A. – nine in 2012, fifteen in 2013.  In 2014, the Court decided ten cases from Los Angeles, one from Ventura and one from Santa Barbara.

Almost all of the Court’s civil Second District cases in recent years have originated in Los Angeles – eleven in 2015, twenty-two in 2016, fourteen in 2017, nine in 2018 and five so far this year in 2019.  The Court has decided only two other civil Second District cases – one from Ventura in 2018 and one from Santa Barbara in 2017.

Finally, we compare the counties’ population share to their share of the cases.

Los Angeles county accounted for 86.62% of the population according to the 2010 census, but 91.79% of the civil cases between 1990 and 2019.  Santa Barbara was 3.74% of the population and 4.21% of the cases.  Ventura was 7.26% of the population and only 2.74% of the cases.  Finally, San Luis Obispo accounted for 2.38% of the District’s population and 1.26% of the cases.

Join us back here later this week as we look at the Court’s Second District criminal cases.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Pacheco (no changes).

Where Did the Supreme Court’s Second District Civil Cases Come From (1990-2004)?

Last week, we reviewed the data on how the Supreme Court’s First District civil and criminal cases were distributed among the counties of the District.  Today, we’re looking at the Second District.

There are only four counties in the Second District – Los Angeles, Ventura, Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo.  Given that Los Angeles accounts for 86.62% of the total population of the Second, it’ll surprise no one to hear that it also produces the overwhelming majority of the Second District cases.  Nonetheless, let’s go to the data.

In 1990, the Court decided thirteen cases from Los Angeles and two from Santa Barbara.  In 1991, the Court decided a dozen civil cases from L.A. and two from Ventura.  In 1992, the Court decided fifteen cases from Los Angeles and two from Santa Barbara.  In 1993, all ten of the Court’s Second District civil cases were from Los Angeles.  In 1994, the Court decided fourteen cases from Los Angeles, two from Santa Barbara and one from Ventura.

In 1995, the Court decided seventeen cases from Los Angeles, two from Santa Barbara and one from Ventura.  In 1996, the Court decided sixteen cases from Los Angeles and two from Santa Barbara.  In 1997, the Court decided seventeen cases from Los Angeles, two from Ventura and one from San Luis Obispo.  In 1998, the Court decided seventeen cases from Los Angeles and one from Ventura county.  In 1999, the Court decided twenty cases from Los Angeles and one each from Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo.

In 2000, the Court decided twenty-one civil cases from Los Angeles and one from San Luis Obispo.  In 2001, the Court decided fifteen cases from L.A. and one from Santa Barbara.  In 2002, the Court decided fourteen cases from Los Angeles, two from Ventura and one from Santa Barbara.  In 2003, the Court decided thirteen cases from Los Angeles and one from Santa Barbara.  In 2004, all twenty-two civil cases decided from the Second District originated in Los Angeles county.

Join us back here next time as we address the years 2005 to 2019.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Robert Couse-Baker (no changes).

Where Did the Supreme Court’s First District Criminal Cases Come From?

Last time, we reviewed the distribution of the First District’s criminal cases at the Supreme Court among the First’s counties between 1990 and 2004.  This time, we’re reviewing the data for the years 2005 to 2019.

In 2005, the Supreme Court decided one criminal case each from Alameda, Marin and San Mateo counties.  In 2006, the Court decided two cases each from Contra Costa, San Francisco and Solano counties and one from San Mateo.  The following year, the Court decided two cases from Alameda and one each from San Francisco and Solano.  In 2008, the Court decided one case each from Contra Costa, Lake and San Mateo counties.  In 2009, the Court decided two cases each from Alameda and Contra Costa.

In 2010, the Court decided one case each from Alameda, Contra Costa, San Francisco, Solano and Sonoma counties.  In 2011, the Court decided two cases from Contra Costa.  In 2012, the Court decided two cases from Alameda, two from Sonoma and one each from San Francisco, San Mateo and Solano counties.  In 2013, the Court decided one case from San Francisco.  In 2014, the Court decided one case each from Alameda, Contra Costa and San Mateo counties.

The Court decided two criminal cases from Contra Costa county in 2015 and one each from Alameda, San Francisco and Sonoma.  In 2016, the Court decided one case from Contra Costa.  The following year, the Court decided one case each from Contra Costa and Solano counties.  In 2018, the Court decided three cases from Alameda and one each from Contra Costa and San Francisco counties.  The Court has decided no criminal cases from the First District so far in 2019.

For the most part, each county’s overall share of the criminal cases from the First District was at least relatively close to that county’s share of the First District’s population.  Contra Costa accounted for 23.85% of the caseload and 18.45% of the population.  Alameda county accounted for 16.15% of the cases and 26.57% of the population.  San Francisco county produced 15.38% of the cases and 14.16% of the population.  San Mateo county produced 10% of the cases and accounted for 12.64% of the population.  Solano county produced 8.46% of the cases and 7.27% of the population.  Marin county accounted for 7.69% of the cases, but only 4.44% of the population.  Sonoma county produced 6.92% of the cases and 8.51% of the population.  Lake county produced 4.62% of the cases but only 1.14% of the population.  Mendocino county accounted for 3.85% of the cases but only 1.55% of the population.  Humboldt county was 2.31% of the caseload and 2.37% of the population.  Criminal cases from Napa county were quite rare – only 0.77% of the cases.  Napa is 2.4% of the population.  The Court decided no criminal cases from Del Norte county, and is only 0.5% of the total District population.

Join us later this week as we turn our attention to the Court’s Second District cases.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Nick Amoscato (no changes).

Where Did the Court’s First District Criminal Cases Come From (Part 1 of 2)?

Last week, we tracked which county Circuit Courts accounted for the Supreme Court’s First District civil cases from 1990 to 2019.  This week, we’re looking at the criminal side.

In 1990, the Court decided one case each from Contra Costa county and Mendocino.  In 1991, the Court decided one case from Alameda, Humboldt and Sonoma.  In 1992, the Court decided two cases from San Francisco and one from Contra Costa.  In 1993, the Court decided one case each from five different counties: Humboldt, Lake, Mendocino, San Francisco and San Mateo.  In 1994, the Court decided one case from Contra Costa, one from San Mateo and one from Sonoma county.

In 1995, the Supreme Court decided two cases from Contra Costa county, two from San Francisco, and one each from Lake and Marin counties.  In 1996, the Court decided four from San Francisco, three from Contra Costa and one each from Marin and Napa.  The following year, the Court decided one case each from Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, San Francisco and San Mateo counties.  In 1998, the Court decided one case from Contra Costa, one from San Mateo and one from Sonoma.  In 1999, the Court decided three criminal cases from Contra Costa, two from Alameda, and one each from Lake, Mendocino, San Francisco and Sonoma counties.

In 2000, the Court decided one criminal case each from Marin, San Francisco and Solano counties.  In 2001, it decided two cases from Marin and one each from Contra Costa, San Mateo and Solano.  The following year, the Court decided two cases from Alameda and Lake counties, and one case from each of five different counties: Humboldt, Marin, San Mateo, Solano and Sonoma.  In 2003, the Court decided two cases from Contra Costa and one from Marin.  Finally, in 2004, the Court decided two criminal cases each from four counties: Alameda, Mendocino, San Mateo and Solano, and one from Contra Costa and Marin county.

Join us back here tomorrow, when we’ll review the data for 2005 to 2019 and sum up.

Image courtesy of Flickr by HarshLight (no changes).

Where Did the Court’s First District Civil Cases Come From (Part 2 of 2)?

Last time, we began reviewing the Supreme Court’s civil cases from the First District, tracking the counties in which the cases originated, five years at a time.  Today we’re reviewing the data for the years 2005-2019.

In 2005, the Court decided five cases from San Francisco, two from Alameda and one from Marin.  In 2006, the Court decided six cases from San Francisco, three from Alameda, two from Humboldt and one from San Mateo.  In 2007, the Court decided four civil cases from San Francisco, two from Solano county and one each from Alameda, Contra Costa and San Mateo.  In 2008, the Court decided two cases from San Francisco and one each from Alameda and Humboldt counties.  In 2009, the Court decided two cases from San Francisco and one case each from Alameda, Marin, Mendocino and Sonoma.

In 2010, the Court decided three cases from San Francisco county, two from Alameda and one from Marin, Solano and Sonoma.  In 2011, the Court decided two cases from San Francisco and one each from Alameda and Contra Costa.  The following year, the Court decided two cases from Alameda and one each from San Francisco and San Mateo.  In 2013, the Court decided two cases from San Francisco and one each from Contra Costa and Marin.  In 2014, the Court decided two civil cases from Alameda county and one from San Francisco.

In 2015, the Court decided three civil cases from Alameda and two from San Francisco.  In 2016, the Court decided one case each from Alameda, San Francisco and San Mateo.  The following year, the Court decided three cases from Marin and one each from Contra Costa and San Francisco.  Last year, the Court decided three cases from San Francisco.  So far this year, the Court has decided four civil cases from San Francisco and one from Alameda.

So how do our totals compare to population?  Reviewing them five years at a time, of course there’s no particular reason to believe that the cases which make it to the Supreme Court should reflect the relative population of the District’s counties.  But over the course of thirty years, might the cases from a county become roughly proportional to population, and therefore (presumably) to total appeals coming out of that county?

In the Table below, we compare (1) the percentage of the First District’s total population accounted for by each county to (2) the percentage of total First District civil cases decided by the Supreme Court 1990-2019 which originated in that county.

Alameda accounts for 26.57% of the First District population but has only had 16.3% of the civil cases.  Contra Costa county is 18.45% of the population but only 7.49% of the cases.  San Francisco is 14.16% of the District population but accounted for 45.82% of the cases.  San Mateo was 12.64% of the population, but only 8.37% of the cases.  Three of the less populous counties were “overrepresented” in the sense that they accounted for a higher share of cases than population (the first number in parentheses is the population percentage, the second is the cases): Marin (4.44%; 7.49%), Mendocino (1.55%; 1.76%); and Lake (1.14%; 1.32%).  Five counties were “underrepresented” in the Court’s cases: Sonoma (8.51%; 4.44%); Solano (7.27%; 4.85%); Napa (2.4%; 0.44%) and Humboldt (2.37%; 1.76%).  The smallest county in the First District, Del Norte county, accounts for 0.5% of the total population, but the Court has not decided a single civil case from Del Norte since 1990.

Join us back here next week as we review the criminal docket for the First District.

Image courtesy of Flickr by David Sawyer (no changes).

Where Did the Court’s First District Civil Cases Come From (Part 1 of 2)?

Last time, we reviewed which Districts and Divisions of the Court of Appeal produced the Supreme Court’s civil and criminal dockets.  This week, we’re drilling down a bit more and looking at the originating trial courts.  Since we reviewed this data about eighteen months ago, we’re looking at it this time in a slightly different way – five years at a time, which of the counties assigned to each District produced the Court’s cases.  We begin with the First District.

Twelve counties are assigned to the First District: Alameda, Contra Costa, Del Norte, Humboldt, Lake, Marin, Mendocino, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Solano and Sonoma.  To make the comparison to case numbers easier, we calculate population as a percentage of the total population of the District’s counties, using the 2010 census.  Alameda county accounts for 26.57% of the District’s population.  Contra Costa county is 18.45%.  San Francisco county is 14.16% and San Mateo county is 12.64%.  Sonoma county is 8.51% of the District’s population, Solano is 7.27%, Marin is 4.44%, Napa is 2.4%, Humboldt is 2.37%, Mendocino is 1.55%, Lake is 1.14% and Del Norte county accounts for 0.5% of the District.

In 1990, the Court decided three civil cases from San Francisco, two from Alameda and Contra Costa and one each from San Mateo and Sonoma counties.  In 1991, the Court decided two cases from San Francisco and one apiece from San Mateo, Solano, Alameda and Contra Costa.  The following year, the Court decided five cases from San Francisco, two each from Alameda and Contra Costa and one from San Mateo.  In 1993, the Court decided two cases from San Francisco and one each from Alameda, Solano and Sonoma. In 1994, the Court decided four cases from San Francisco, three from Marin and one each from Contra Costa, Humboldt, Lake, Mendocino, San Mateo, Solano and Sonoma counties.

In 1995, the Court decided eight civil cases from San Francisco, two apiece from Alameda, Contra Costa and San Mateo, and one each from Marin, Napa and Solano counties.  In 1996, the Court decided three cases from San Francisco, two from Mendocino and San Mateo and one from Alameda and Marin.  In 1997, the Court decided four cases from San Mateo county, three from Alameda, two each from San Francisco and Solano counties and one from Marin.  In 1998, the Court decided five cases from San Francisco, three from Alameda, two from Solano and one case from Contra Costa, Lake and San Mateo.  In 1999, the Court decided three cases from San Francisco county and one each from Alameda, Lake, Marin and Sonoma.

In 2000, the Court decided six civil cases from San Francisco and one each from Marin, San Mateo and Sonoma.  In 2001, the Court decided four cases from San Francisco and one from Marin.  In 2002, the Court decided six cases from San Francisco and one each from Contra Costa, Marin, San Mateo and Sonoma.  In 2003, the Court decided five cases from San Francisco, two each from Sonoma and Contra Costa and one from Alameda.  In 2004, the Court decided seven civil cases from San Francisco and one from Contra Costa.

Join us back here next time as we review the data for the years 2005 to 2019.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Ken Lund (no changes).

Which Districts of the Court of Appeal Account for the Court’s Criminal Docket (2005-2019)?

This time, we’re concluding our review of the Court of Appeal Districts and Divisions which accounted for the Court’s criminal docket by reviewing the years 2005 to 2019.  Between 2005 and 2009, the Court decided 22 criminal cases from the First District: 7 from Division 2, 4 apiece from Divisions 1, 4 and 5 and 3 from Division 3.

The Court decided 49 cases from the Second District.  There were 10 cases apiece from Divisions 4 and 7, 7 from Divisions 2 and 6, 6 from Division 8, 4 from Divisions 3 and 5 and 1 from Division 1.

The Court decided 34 cases from the Fourth District: 12 from Division 3 and 11 apiece from Divisions 1 and 2.

The Court decided 26 cases from the Third District, 18 cases from the Fifth District, 19 cases from the Sixth District, 1 from the State Bar Court and 132 cases on direct review from the trial courts.

Between 2010 and 2014, criminal cases from the First District fell to 19 – 8 from Division 5, 7 from Division 2, 2 from Division 4 and 1 each from Divisions 1 and 3.

The Court decided 48 cases from the Second District, only one down from the previous five years.  The Court had 10 criminal cases from Division 6, 8 from Division 5, 7 from Divisions 1 and 3, 6 cases from Division 8, 5 from Division 4, 4 from Division 7 and 1 case from Division 2.

The Court’s criminal caseload from the Fourth District was up sharply to 54.  The Court decided 27 criminal cases from Division 1, 14 from Division 2 and 13 from Division 3.

The Court decided 24 cases from the Third District, 13 cases from the Fifth District, 15 from the 6th, 2 from the State Bar Court, 1 on certified question review from the Ninth Circuit and 129 cases on direct review from the trial courts.

Between 2015 and earlier this month in 2019, the Court had decided 13 criminal cases from the First District – 4 each from Divisions 2 and 3, 2 each from Divisions 1 and 5 and 1 case from Division 4.

The Court has decided 30 cases from the Second District – 7 from Division 5, 6 from Division 8, 5 from Division 6, 4 from Division 3, 3 from Division 4, 2 each from Divisions 1 and 2 and 1 from Division 7.

The Court has decided 46 cases from the Fourth District – 17 from Division 2, 16 from Division 1 and 13 from Division 3.

The Court has decided 12 cases from the Third District, 10 from the Sixth District, 5 cases from the Fifth District and 89 cases on direct review from the trial courts.

Join us back here this coming week as we turn our attention to a new topic.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Kirt Edblom (no changes).

Which Districts of the Court of Appeal Account for the Court’s Criminal Docket (1990-2004)?

Last week, we reviewed the Districts and Divisions which accounted for the Supreme Court’s civil docket between 1990 and 2019.  This week, we’re looking at the sources of the criminal docket.

Between 1990 and 1994, the Court decided 16 criminal cases from the First District: 5 each from Divisions 4 and 5, 3 from Division 3, 2 from Division 1 and 1 from Division 2. 

The Court also decided 16 cases from the Second District: 5 from Division 5, 4 from Divisions 1 and 7, and 1 each from Divisions 2, 3 and 6.

The Court decided 40 cases from the Fourth District: 15 each from Divisions 1 and 3 and 10 from Division 2.

The Court decided 15 criminal cases from the Sixth District, 14 from the Fifth District and 8 from the Third District.  The Court decided 122 cases on direct review from the trial courts – the vast majority death penalty decisions.  The Court decided 64 cases from the state bar court and 1 from the Commission on Judicial Performance.

Between 1995 and 1999, the Court decided 32 criminal cases from the First District: 10 from Division 3, 6 each from Divisions 2 and 5 and 5 each from Divisions 1 and 4.  The Court decided 45 criminal cases from the Second District.  There were 9 cases from Division 6, 7 from Division 7, 6 each from Divisions 1, 4 and 5, 5 cases from Divisions 2 and 3 and 1 from Division 8.

The Court decided 33 criminal cases from the Fourth District: 13 from Division 3 and 10 each from Divisions 1 and 2.

The Court decided 19 cases from the Sixth District, 12 from the Third District and 7 from the Second District.  Seventy-five direct appeals were decided, plus 3 cases from the state bar court.

Criminal cases from the First District were down slightly from 2000 to 2004, with the Court handing down 30 decisions.  The Court decided 11 cases from Division 4, 7 from Division 5, 5 each from Divisions 2 and 3 and 2 from Division 1.

The Court decided 77 cases from the Second District.  Seventeen cases came from Division 7, 14 each from Divisions 1 and 4, 12 from Division 3, 8 from Division 5, 7 from Division 6 and 5 from Division 2.

The Court decided 55 criminal cases from the Fourth District, a significant increase from the previous five years.  The Court decided 26 cases from Division 1, 19 from Division 3 and 10 from Division 2.

The Court decided 27 criminal cases from the Third District between 2000 and 2004, 18 cases from the Fifth District and 14 from the Sixth District.  The Court decided 91 direct appeals from the trial courts, as usual, the vast majority death penalty appeals.  The Court decided 4 cases from the bar court.

Join us back here tomorrow as we review the years 2005 to 2019.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Ken Lund (no changes).

Where in the Court of Appeal Have the Court’s Civil Cases Come From (2005-2019)?

Civil cases from San Francisco’s First District were down between 2005 and 2009 from 43 to 37.  The Court decided 11 cases from Division 5, 8 from Divisions 1 and 3, 7 from Division 4 and 6 from Division 2.

Cases from the Second District were down a bit to 89.  The Court decided 20 cases from Division 5, 19 from Division 3, 9 cases each from Divisions 2, 4 and 8, 8 cases each from Divisions 6 and 7 and 7 cases from Division 1.

Cases from the Fourth District were down by one to 49.  The Court decided 23 cases from Division 1, 17 from Division 2 and 9 from Division 3.

The Court decided 36 civil cases from the Third District, 12 from the Sixth and 10 from the Fifth.  Finally, the Court decided 6 civil cases on certified question review from the Ninth Circuit, 1 case from the D.C. Circuit and 1 case on direct review from the trial courts.

Cases from California’s three biggest metropolitan areas were down across the board from 2010 to 2014: in the Second District, cases were down from 89 to 67, Fourth District cases were down from 49 to 21 and First District cases were down from 37 to 24.

In San Francisco’s First District, the Court decided 9 civil cases from Division 4, 5 each from Divisions 2 and 5, 2 from Division 3 and 2 from Division 1.

In the Second District, the Court decided a dozen cases each from Divisions 3 and 5.  The Court decided 10 cases from Divisions 1 and 4.  The Court decided 9 cases from Division 8, 5 each from Divisions 2 and 7 and 4 from Division 6.

From the Fourth District, the Court decided 9 cases from Division 3, 7 cases from Division 1 and only 5 cases from Division 2.

The Court decided 13 cases from the Sixth District, 9 cases from the Third and 5 from the Fifth District.  The Court decided 14 cases on certified question review from the Ninth Circuit, 2 on original jurisdiction and one which arose directly from the trial court.

From 2015 to date, the Court has decided 19 civil cases from the First District.  The Court has decided five cases from Division 3, 4 each from Divisions 4 and 5, and 3 each from Divisions 1 and 2.

The Court has decided 65 civil cases from the Second District.  The Court has decided 14 cases from Division 1, a dozen from Division 3, 10 from Division 7, 9 from Division 4, 6 from Divisions 5 and 8, and 4 cases from Divisions 2 and 6.

The Court has decided 39 civil cases from the Fourth District: 18 from Division 1, a dozen from Division 3 and 9 from Division 2.

The Court has decided 8 cases each from the Third and Fifth Districts and 5 from the Sixth.  The Court has decided 8 cases on certified question review from the Ninth Circuit and 2 each on direct review from the trial courts and invoking the Court’s original jurisdiction.

Join us back here next week as we look at the distribution of the Court’s criminal docket.

Image courtesy of Flickr by MoonJazz (no changes).

Which Districts of the Court of Appeal Account for the Supreme Court’s Civil Docket (1990-2004)?

This week, we’re looking at a new subject – updating our data on the Court of Appeal Districts and Divisions which produced the Supreme Court’s docket.  First up – the civil cases.

Between 1990 and 1994, the Court decided 45 civil cases from San Francisco’s First District – 1 which we were unable to attribute to a particular Division, 14 from Division 2, 8 from Divisions 1 and 4, and 7 from Divisions 3 and 5. 

The Court decided 77 civil cases from LA’s Second District.  Sixteen cases were from Division 7, 15 were from Division 1, 13 were from Division 3, 12 were from Division 6, 8 were from Division 5, 7 were from Division 4 and 6 were from Division 2.

The Court decided 52 cases from the San Diego area’s Fourth District – 19 from Division 1, 12 from Division 2 and 21 from Division 3.

The Court decided 16 cases from the Third Division, 15 from the Sixth Division and 11 cases from the Fifth Division.  The Court decided 10 cases which arrived on direct review.

The civil caseload from the First District increased between 1995 and 1999 to 60 cases – 15 from Division 4, 13 from Divisions 2 and 3, 10 from Division 1 and 9 from Division 5.

Cases from the Second District were up too, to 93 in all.  The Court decided 17 cases from Division 5, 14 cases from Divisions 1 and 7, 13 cases from Divisions 3 and 4, 12 cases from Division 2 and 10 from Division 6.

Cases from the Fourth District were down to 34.  The Court decided 14 cases from Division 1, 11 from Division 2 and 9 from Division 3.

The Court also decided 23 cases which arrived from the Third District, 11 from the Sixth District, 10 from the Fifth District, 11 on direct review and 1 which invoked the Court’s original jurisdiction.

Civil cases from the First District fell between 2000 and 2004 to 43.  The Court decided 11 civil cases from Divisions 1 and 2, 8 from Divisions 4 and 5, and 5 from Division 3.

Cases from the Second District were up slightly to 95: 20 from Division 3, 17 from Division 4, 16 from Division 1, 15 from Division 7, 13 from Division 5, 8 from Division 6, 5 from Division 2 and 1 from Division 8. 

Cases from the Fourth District were up to 50: 17 each from Divisions 1 and 3 and 16 from Division 2.

The Court decided 20 cases from the Third District, 11 from the Fifth District and 10 from the Sixth District.  The Court decided 11 cases on certified question review from the Ninth Circuit and one on original jurisdiction.

Join us back here later this weekend and we’ll review the data from the years 2005 to 2019.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Nicolas Raymond (no changes).

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