What Counties Produce the Court’s Criminal Docket (Part 4)?

In our last post, we looked at the originating trial courts for the Supreme Court’s civil docket for the years 2009 through 2013.  With this post, we’re looking at the Court’s criminal docket for the same years.

In 2009, the Court decided a dozen criminal cases from Los Angeles.  The Court decided five cases from Alameda, Riverside and Santa Clara counties, four from San Diego, three from Fresno, Sacramento and Monterey counties, and two from Contra Costa, Kern, Orange, San Bernardino, San Joaquin and Yolo counties.  The Court decided one criminal case apiece from  Imperial, San Mateo, San Francisco, Ventura, Madera, Kings, Lassen, Trinity and Nevada counties.

In 2010, the Court decided eighteen criminal cases from Los Angeles.  The Court decided eight cases from San Diego, seven from Riverside, six from San Bernardino, five from Orange and four from Sacramento County and from the Court’s original jurisdiction.  The Court decided three criminal cases from Alameda County and two from Santa Clara, Ventura and Solano counties.  The Court decided one criminal case each from Contra Costa, Kern, Sonoma, Yuba, Butte, San Francisco, Santa Barbara, Tulare, San Luis Obispo, Kings, Lassen and Trinity counties.

In 2011, the Court decided eleven criminal cases from Los Angeles.  The Court decided eight cases from Riverside and six cases from San Diego County.  The Court decided three criminal cases from Orange and Sacramento counties, and two each from Contra Costa, Fresno, Kern, San Bernardino, Santa Clara, Ventura and Monterey counties.  The Court decided one criminal case apiece from Alameda, Sonoma, Tulare, Humboldt, Kings and Sutter counties.

In 2012, the Court decided twenty-one criminal cases from Los Angeles.  The Court decided six cases from San Diego, five from Alameda, Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino counties, four from Kern County, three from Sacramento, Santa Clara and Yolo counties and two from Sonoma, Ventura and Lassen counties.  The Court decided one criminal case each from Placer, San Joaquin, San Mateo, Santa Cruz,  Yuba, San Francisco, Madera, Napa, Tulare, Solano and Monterey counties.

In 2013, the Court decided thirteen cases from Los Angeles.  The Court decided six cases from Orange County, five from Santa Clara, four from Kern, Riverside and San Diego and two from Contra Costa, San Bernardino and Stanislaus counties.  The Court decided one criminal case each from Alameda, Sacramento, San Francisco, Santa Barbara, Tulare, Monterey and Kings counties, and one certified question appeal from the Northern District of California.

Join us back here next Thursday as we turn our attention to the Court’s most recent years.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Jeff Turner (no changes).

What Counties Produce the Court’s Civil Docket (Part 4)?

For the past several weeks, we’ve been reviewing the trial courts which produced the Supreme Court’s civil and criminal dockets since 1994.  This week, we’re looking at the years 2009 through 2013 – first up, the civil docket.

The Supreme Court decided only a dozen civil cases from Los Angeles in 2009.  The Court decided five cases from San Diego, four from Orange County, three from Sacramento, and two from Santa Clara, San Francisco, Riverside, Monterey and San Luis Obispo counties.  The Court decided one civil case each from Sonoma, Marin, Mendocino, Alameda, San Joaquin, San Luis Obispo and Yolo counties.  The Court also heard one civil case on direct appeal from an administrative agency, one case within its original jurisdiction, and one case each on certified questions from the United States District Courts for the Central, Northern and Southern Districts of California.

The Court decided thirteen civil cases from Los Angeles in 2010.  The Court decided five civil cases from Santa Clara and four certified question appeals from the Central District of California.  The Court decided three civil cases each from San Francisco and Orange counties and two from Sacramento and Alameda counties.  The Court decided one civil case from Sonoma, San Diego, Marin, Solano, San Joaquin, San Luis Obispo, Monterey and Yolo counties.  The Court also decided one civil case within its original jurisdiction and one certified question appeal from the Northern District of California.

In 2011, the Court decided fifteen civil cases from Los Angeles.  The rest of the Court’s civil docket was widely scattered – two cases each from San Francisco, San Diego and Orange counties, and two certified question appeals each from the Central and Northern Districts of California.  The Court decided one civil case each from Sacramento, San Bernardino, Contra Costa, Ventura, Alameda and Monterey counties.  The Court also decided one case on direct administrative appeal and one case arising from its original jurisdiction.

In 2012, the Court decided only nine civil cases from Los Angeles.  The Court decided three cases each from San Diego and Orange counties, two from Santa Clara, Sacramento and Alameda counties, and one case each from San Francisco, Riverside, San Mateo and Stanislaus counties, and one case arising in the Court’s original jurisdiction.

In 2013, the Court decided fifteen civil cases from Los Angeles.  The rest of the civil docket was once again widely distributed – two cases from Santa Clara and San Francisco counties, and two certified questions from the Central District of California.  The Court decided one civil case each from Sacramento, San Diego, Orange, Marin, Fresno, Riverside, San Bernardino, Contra Costa and Santa Cruz counties, one case on direct appeal from an administrative agency, and one certified question appeal from the Southern District of California.

Join us back here later today as we address the Court’s criminal docket for the same years.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Curtis Abert (no changes).

Which Counties Produce the Court’s Criminal Docket (Part 3)?

Yesterday, we reviewed which counties produced the Supreme Court’s civil docket, year by year, for the years 2004 through 2008.  Today, we’re looking at the criminal docket for the same years.

In 2004, the Court decided sixteen criminal cases from the Los Angeles Superior Court.  It decided nine cases from San Diego, five cases from Orange and San Bernardino counties, four cases from Sacramento and Shasta counties, three cases from Alameda, Contra Costa and Santa Clara counties, and two cases from Riverside, San Joaquin, San Mateo, Mendocino and Solano counties.  The Court decided one criminal case from Fresno, Kern, Butte, Marin, Stanislaus, Tehama, San Luis Obispo, El Dorado and Trinity counties.

In 2005, the Court decided twenty-five criminal cases from Los Angeles.  It decided four criminal cases from Alameda, Kern, Orange and Sacramento counties, three from San Diego and Santa Clara counties, and two from Fresno and San Mateo counties.  The Court decided one case apiece from Riverside, San Joaquin, Marin, Stanislaus, Ventura, Merced, Tuolumne, Tulare and Colusa counties, as well as one case from the State Bar Court.

The Court decided only eleven criminal cases from Los Angeles in 2006.  The Court decided six cases from Santa Clara County, four from Alameda, Kern and Sacramento counties, and three from Orange and San Mateo counties.  The Court decided two criminal cases each from Contra Costa, Fresno, San Francisco and Solano counties.  The Court decided one criminal case each from Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego, Santa Cruz, Butte, Santa Barbara, Shasta, Yolo, Kings and San Benito counties.

In 2007, the Court decided nineteen criminal cases from Los Angeles County,  The Court decided seven cases from Orange and San Diego counties, five from Alameda, four from Riverside and San Bernardino counties, three from Santa Clara County, and two from Contra Costa County.  The Court decided one case each from Placer, Sacramento, San Francisco, Ventura, San Luis Obispo and Solano counties.

Finally, in 2008, the Court decided nineteen criminal cases from Los Angeles County.  The Court decided seven cases from Orange and San Diego, five from Alameda, four from Riverside, San Bernardino and Tulare counties, and three from Santa Clara County.  The Court decided two cases from Contra Costa County, and one case each from Placer, Sacramento, San Francisco, Ventura, San Luis Obispo and Solano counties.

Join us back here next Thursday as we review the Court’s civil and criminal dockets for the years 2009 through 2013.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Rich Bowen (no changes).

Which Counties Produce the Court’s Civil Docket (Part 3)?

For the past two weeks, we’ve been considering which county trial courts produce the Court’s civil and criminal dockets, year by year.  This week, we’re looking at the data for the years 2004 through 2008.

In 2008, the Court decided twenty-two civil cases from Los Angeles County.  The Court decided seven cases from San Francisco, five cases from San Diego and Orange County, and three cases from Sacramento County.  The Court decided one case each from Fresno, Riverside, Contra Costa, Kings, Tulare, Santa Cruz, Shasta and Yolo counties, as well as one case from the Court’s original jurisdiction, one direct appeal from the administrative agencies, and one certified question from the United States District Court for the Central District of California.

In 2005, the Court decided sixteen civil cases from Los Angeles.  The Court decided five cases each from San Francisco and Sacramento, four from San Diego, three from Santa Clara and Riverside, and two cases each from Fresno, San Bernardino and Alameda counties.  The Court heard one case from Orange, Marin, Santa Barbara, Kern, Stanislaus and El Dorado counties.  The Court also heard one direct appeal from an administrative agency and one case on certified question review from the United States District Court for the Central District of California.

In 2006, the Court decided eighteen civil cases from Los Angeles, six from San Francisco and five from Sacramento.  The Court decided three cases from Alameda County and three direct appeals from administrative agencies.  The Court decided two civil cases from San Diego, Humboldt, Santa Barbara and San Bernardino counties.  The Court decided one civil case from San Mateo, Kern, San Luis Obispo, Monterey, Tulare, Santa Cruz, Shasta, Sierra and Inyo counties, as well as one case on certified question review from the Central District of California.

In 2007, the Court decided seventeen civil cases from Los Angeles.  The Court decided four cases each from San Francisco, Sacramento and San Diego.  The Court decided three cases from Orange and San Bernardino counties, as well as three cases on direct appeal from administrative agencies.  The Court decided two cases from Santa Clara and Solano counties.  The Court decided one case each from Riverside, Santa Barbara, San Mateo, Contra Costa, Alameda, San Joaquin, Sutter, Kings, Tulare, Shasta, Imperial and Merced counties, and one case on certified question review from the Central District.

In 2008, the Court decided nineteen civil cases from Los Angeles.  The Court decided seven civil cases each from San Diego and Orange counties.  The Court decided five cases from Alameda County and four from Riverside, San Bernardino and Tulare.  The Court decided three cases from Santa Clara County, and two from Contra Costa.  Finally, the Court decided one case each from San Francisco, Sacramento, Solano, Ventura, San Luis Obispo and Placer counties.

Join us back here tomorrow as we review the Court’s criminal, quasi-criminal and disciplinary docket for these same years.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Marco Verch (no changes).

Which Counties Produce the Court’s Criminal Docket (Part 2)?

Yesterday, we reviewed the year by year data on which trial courts produced the Court’s civil docket for the years 1999 through 2003.  Today, we’re looking at the criminal docket.

In 1999, the Court decided nineteen criminal cases from Los Angeles County.  The rest of the docket was quite spread out.  The Court decided three cases from Alameda, Contra Costa, Orange, Santa Clara and Santa Barbara counties.  The Court decided two cases from Riverside, San Diego and San Joaquin counties.  The Court decided one criminal case apiece from Fresno, Kern, San Bernardino, Santa Cruz, Sonoma, Yuba, Lake, San Francisco, Madera, Tuolumne, Tulare, Calaveras, Mendocino and San Luis Obispo counties.

In 2000, the Court decided twenty-five criminal, quasi-criminal and disciplinary cases from Los Angeles.  The Court decided nine cases from San Diego, four from Orange County, three from Santa Clara, two each from Ventura and the State Bar Court, and one case from Alameda, Kern, San Bernardino, San Joaquin, Marin, San Francisco, Madera, Shasta, El Dorado and Solano counties.

In 2001, the Court decided twenty cases from Los Angeles.  The Court decided five cases from Riverside, three from Santa Clara County, two from Fresno, Kern, Sacramento, San Bernardino, Marin, Shasta and Tehama counties, two from the Court’s original jurisdiction and two from the State Bar Court, and one case each from  Contra Costa, San Joaquin, San Mateo, Santa Cruz, Ventura, Solano and Yolo counties.

In 2002, the Court decided nineteen cases from Los Angeles.  The Court decided nine cases from San Diego, six from Orange County, five from Alameda, three from Kern County and two from Sacramento, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Lake, Stanislaus and Shasta counties, and two from the Court’s original jurisdiction.  Finally, the Court decided one case each rising from Fresno, Imperial, San Bernardino, Sonoma, Butte, Marin, San Francisco, Ventura, Tuolumne, Tulare, Solano, Humboldt and Monterey counties.

For the year 2003, the Court decided nineteen criminal cases from Los Angeles County.  The Court decided six cases from Orange County, four from Riverside County and three from Contra Costa, Fresno, Kern, San Diego and El Dorado counties.  The Court decided two cases apiece from San Bernardino, Santa Clara, Shasta and Tulare counties.  The Court decided one criminal case apiece from Alameda, Placer, Sacramento, Butte, Marin, Stanislaus, Tehama, Solano, Monterey, Kings and Lassen counties.

Join us back here next Thursday as we turn to the years 2004 through 2008.

Image courtesy of Pixabay by Hazelw90 (no changes).

What Counties Produce the Court’s Civil Docket (Part 2)?

Last week, we began reviewing the trial courts from which the state Supreme Court’s civil and criminal dockets arise year by year, both here and over on our sister blog the Illinois Supreme Court Review.  This week, we’re reviewing the data for the years 1999-2003 – first, the civil docket.

In 1999, as always, Los Angeles led the way, as the Court decided twenty civil cases originating there.  Santa Clara and Sacramento counties produced four cases apiece; San Francisco and San Diego counties produced three each, and the Court decided three cases arising under its original jurisdiction.  The Court decided two civil cases from Orange County, and one each from Sonoma, Lake, Marin, Santa Barbara, Alameda, San Joaquin, San Luis Obispo, Calaveras and Tuolomne counties, plus one direct administrative appeal and one case from the Council on Judicial Performance.

In 2000, the Court decided twenty-one civil cases originating in trial court in Los Angeles.  The Court decided six cases from San Francisco, three from Santa Clara, two from Sacramento, San Diego, Riverside and San Joaquin, and one case each from Sonoma, Marin, San Bernardino, San Mateo, San Luis Obispo, Monterey and Tulare counties, and one certified question each from the United States District Courts for the Northern and Central Districts of California.

In 2001, the civil caseload from Los Angeles was down to fifteen.  The Court decided eight civil cases from Orange County, four from San Francisco and four from San Diego, and two from Sacramento, San Bernardino and Kern counties, two direct administrative appeals and two certified questions originating in the Central District of California.  The Court decided one civil case each from Marin, Fresno, Riverside, Santa Barbara, San Joaquin and Kings counties.

In 2002, the Court decided fourteen civil cases from Los Angeles County.  The Court decided six cases from San Francisco, three from Orange, San Bernardino and Ventura counties, and two from Santa Clara, Sacramento, San Diego, Fresno and Riverside counties.  The Court decided one case apiece from Sonoma, Marin, Santa Barbara, San Mateo and Contra Costa counties, as well as single certified question appeals from the Northern, Central and Eastern Districts of California.

In 2003, the Court decided a dozen civil cases from Los Angeles.  The Court decided five cases each from San Francisco and Sacramento, three from Santa Clara and San Bernardino counties, and two from Sonoma, Orange and Contra Costa counties.  The Court decided one civil case from Fresno, Riverside, Santa Barbara, Alameda and Kern counties, one direct administrative appeal, and one certified question from the Central District of California.

Join us back here tomorrow as we compare the data for the Court’s criminal docket from these same years.

Image courtesy of Pixabay by Mortenhjerpsted (no changes).

Which Counties Produce the Court’s Criminal Docket (Part 1)?

Yesterday, we reviewed the counties which produced the Supreme Court’s civil docket for the years 1994 through 1998.  Today, we’re reviewing the Court’s criminal docket for the same years.

In 1994, the Court decided nine criminal cases from Los Angeles.  The Court decided six cases from San Diego, three from Orange, Riverside and Santa Clara counties, and two apiece from Kern, San Bernardino and San Mateo counties.  Finally, the Court decided one case from Alameda, Contra Costa, Fresno, Imperial, Placer, Sacramento, San Joaquin, Santa Cruz, Sonoma, West Orange and Yuba counties.

In 1995, the Court decided eleven cases which originated in Los Angeles.  The Court decided five cases from Santa Clara and Ventura counties, four from Orange County, three from San Diego and from the State Bar Court and two from Contra Costa, Kern, Riverside and San Francisco counties.  The Court decided one case from Fresno, Sacramento, Santa Cruz, Butte, Glenn, Lake, Marin, Stanislaus and Madera counties, and one case from the Court’s original jurisdiction.

In 1996, the Court decided seven criminal cases from Los Angeles County.  The Court decided five cases from San Diego and four from San Francisco and Santa Clara counties.  The Court decided three cases from Contra Costa and Sacramento counties and two each from Fresno, Kern, Riverside and Merced counties.  Finally, the Court decided one case each from Orange, Santa Cruz, Marin, Stanislaus, Napa and Santa Barbara counties, and one each from the Court’s original jurisdiction and the Council of Judicial Performance.

In 1997, the Court decided thirteen cases which originated in the trial court in Los Angeles.  The Court decided seven cases from Orange County and three apiece from San Mateo and Santa Clara counties.  The Court decided two cases apiece from Riverside, Sacramento and San Diego counties.  The Court decided one case each from Alameda, Contra Costa, Kern, San Bernardino, Santa Cruz, Marin, San Francisco, Madera, Shasta, Tehama and Tuolumne counties, and one case from the Court’s original jurisdiction.

Finally, we report the data for 1998.  The Court decided fourteen criminal cases from Los Angeles.  The Court decided four cases from Orange County.  The Court decided three cases from Contra Costa, Riverside and San Diego counties, and two each from Kern, Sacramento, San Bernardino and Santa Barbara counties.  Finally, the Court decided one case apiece from San Joaquin, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, Sonoma, Butte, San Francisco, Amador and Tulare counties, and one case from the Court’s original jurisdiction.

Join us back here next Thursday as we turn our attention to the next five years of the Court’s history.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Kelly Hunter (no changes).

 

Which Counties Produce the Court’s Civil Docket (Part 1)?

Last week, we completed our review of the government’s winning percentage in civil cases between 1994 and the present.  This week, we’re beginning a new subject – which trial courts accounted for the Court’s civil and criminal dockets?  First up: the civil docket for the years 1994 through 1998.

In 1994, the Court decided fifteen cases from Los Angeles.  The Court decided five cases from Orange County, four from San Francisco, three from Marin and Santa Clara counties and two each from San Diego, Fresno, Riverside and Santa Barbara counties.  The Court decided one case from each of the following jurisdictions: Sonoma, Sacramento, Lake, Trinity, Humboldt, San Bernardino, Solano, San Mateo, Contra Costa, Ventura and Medocino counties, plus one case each from the Council on Judicial Performance and from administrative entities.

In 1995, the Court decided seventeen cases which originated in Los Angeles County.  The Court decided eight cases from San Francisco, four from Sacramento County and the Council on Judicial Performance, three from Santa Clara County and the Court’s original jurisdiction, and two each from Orange, Santa Barbara, San Mateo and Contra Costa counties.  The Court decided one case each from San Diego, Marin, Riverside, Solano, Ventura, Alameda, Marin, Napa and San Benito counties, and one case whose origin we were unable to identify.

We report the data for 1996 in Table 358.  The Court decided eight cases from Los Angeles that year.  The Court decided three cases from San Francisco and San Diego, two from Orange, San Mateo and Mendocino counties, and one case each from Sacramento, Marin, Santa Barbara, Alameda, Butte, Kern, Nevada, San Joaquin and Sutter counties, and one case originating in an administrative agency.

In 1997, the Court’s civil caseload from Los Angeles doubled to 17 cases.  The Court decided four cases from San Mateo County, three from Sacramento, San Diego and Alameda counties, two each from San Francisco, Fresno, Riverside, Solano, Ventura and Stanislaus counties, and two appeals from administrative agencies.  The Court decided one case apiece from Santa Clara, Orange, Marin, San Bernardino, Kings and San Luis Obispo counties.

Finally, we report the data for 1998 in Table 360 below.  The Court decided seventeen cases from Los Angeles.  The Court decided five cases from San Francisco and four each from Sacramento, San Diego and Riverside counties.  The Court decided three cases from Alameda County and three direct appeals from administrative agencies, and two each from Santa Clara, Orange and Solano counties and from the Council on Judicial Performance.  The Court decided one case apiece from Lake, San Bernardino, San Mateo, Contra Costa, Ventura and Kern counties.

Join us back here tomorrow as we review the Court’s criminal docket for the same years.

Image courtesy of Flickr by SheltieBoy (no changes).

 

How Often Do Governmental Entities Win Their Civil Appeals (Part 4)?

For the past two weeks, we’ve been reviewing the government’s winning percentage as appellant in civil appeals at the California Supreme Court, year by year and by area of law.  Today, we complete our survey, looking at the years 2013 through 2016.

Government appeals were not only a bit less common during these years than in the data we reviewed yesterday for the years 2006 through 2012 – the government’s winning percentage was down a bit.  In 2013, the Court decided only two civil cases in which a governmental entity was the appellant, and the government lost them both – one in government and administrative law and one in tax law.  The government turned it around in 2014, winning its one case in civil procedure and an environmental law case.  In 2015, governmental entities won single cases in government and administrative law and tax law, but lost an environmental law case.  In 2016, governmental entities won one election law case and an environmental law case and lost a single employment law case, but won five of their six cases involving government and administrative law, for a winning percentage of 83.33%.

With the year rapidly nearing its end, let’s close with a quick advance look at the data so far for 2017.  Year to date, government appellants have won five of seven civil cases.  The government has won both its cases involving government and administrative law, plus single cases in environmental law, insurance law and civil procedure.  Governmental entities have lost one case each in constitutional law and tax law.

Join us back here next Thursday as we turn our attention to a new issue in our ongoing study of the California Supreme Court.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Kitty Terwolbeck (no changes).

How Often Do Governmental Entities Win Their Civil Appeals (Part 3)?

Last week, we began reviewing the winning percentage in civil cases of governmental entity appellants, year by year and one area of law at a time.  We began with the years 1994 through 2005.  This week, we’re reviewing the most recent years, starting today with the data for the years 2006 through 2012.

Overall for the period, the government did quite well in its civil appeals, winning 78% of the time.  In 2006, governmental entities won all three cases involving government and administrative law issues, both environmental law cases and the one employment law case.  The government lost its one constitutional law appeal and its one appeal turning on civil procedure issues.  In 2007, the government won both its government and administrative law cases, both its constitutional law cases, and its single appeals in employment, workers compensation and environmental law.  The government won one of two civil procedure cases and lost its one tort law case.  In 2008, governmental entities won all three environmental law cases, both their constitutional law cases, and their one tort law case.  The government won one of two cases involving government and administrative law, but lost its one employment law case.

In 2009, government entities were undefeated in civil cases as appellant, winning two environmental law cases and one case each in government and administrative law, constitutional law, tort law and workers compensation.  In 2010, the government won its lone tax law case and its election law case, split evenly two cases each in constitutional law, employment law and environmental law, and lost its one case involving government and administrative law.  In 2011, governmental entities won three of four civil cases as appellant, winning single cases in tax law, workers compensation and environmental law, but losing one case in employment law.  In 2012, the government won all six of its civil cases as appellant – two in government and administrative law, two in civil procedure, and one each in environmental and tax law.

Join us back here tomorrow as we review the data for the years 2013 through 2016.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Tom Pavel (no changes).

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