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Kirk Jenkins brings a wealth of experience to his appellate practice, which focuses on antitrust and constitutional law, as well as products liability, RICO, price fixing, information sharing among competitors and class certification. In addition to handling appeals, he also regularly works with trial teams to ensure that important issues are properly presented and preserved for appellate review.  Mr. Jenkins is a pioneer in the application of data analytics to appellate decision-making and writes two analytics blogs, the California Supreme Court Review and the Illinois Supreme Court Review, as well as regularly writing for various legal publications.

Today, we’re reviewing the data for new original proceedings – petitions for writ of mandate, mandamus and the like – between 2001 and 2010.  With the exception of the Fifth District, which saw a 24% increase in original proceedings, the remaining Courts of Appeal saw relatively flat numbers in original proceedings.

The First District began

Today we’re beginning a series of posts examining the declining dockets at the Court of Appeal and assessing the impact on the Supreme Court’s work.

Below, we report the District-by-District new Notices of Appeal numbers (civil, criminal and juvenile) for the years 1996 through 2000.  All data comes from the California Courts Court Statistics Reports,

This time, we’re measuring the length of Supreme Court review in civil cases by an alternative measure – the average number of days from the close of briefing to oral argument.  One caveat – this data set runs from the close of all briefing – including amici and any supplemental briefs – to oral argument. 

Turning finally to the Sixth District, according to the 2020 census, Santa Clara County was 73.17% of the population.  Monterey County accounted for 16.59% of the population among the three counties contributing cases to the docket and Santa Cruz was 10.24%.

Santa Clara County had cases on the Supreme Court’s civil docket in seven of

With this post, we turn our attention to the Fifth District.  Fresno (33.63%) and Kern counties (30.31%) comprise a large slice of the District’s population.  Stanislaus County is 18.43%, Tulare is 15.77% and Tuolumne County is 1.85%.

Fifth District civil cases were relatively uncommon on the Court’s docket between 2010 and 2019.  Fresno County had

The Fourth District is almost equally divided between three counties – San Diego (29.28%), Orange (28.29%) and Riverside (21.47%).  San Bernardino County accounts for 19.37% of the population and Imperial County is 1.6%.

San Diego County had 24 cases for the decade, sending cases to the Supreme Court’s civil docket in nine of ten years. 

According to the 2020 census, Sacramento County accounted for 52.94% of the population of the Third District.  San Joaquin County was 26.02%.  Yolo was 7.23%, Butte County was 7.07%, Shasta County had 6.08% and Plumas County was 0.66% of the District.

During the decade, Sacramento County produced 11 cases for the Supreme Court’s civil docket.